Posts Tagged ‘fresh’

Unrecipe of the Week: How To Pack A Mason Jar Salad

January 21, 2016

 

How-Make-Mason-Jar-SaladAhh, mason jars; Pinterest’s vessel of choice. While we are totally tired of seeing them as mugs, vases and other types of kitchsy decor, we still love them for what they were originally intended to be used for, which is hold food. They are recyclable, don’t have any BPA’s or other harmful chemicals in them, and can go into the freezer, refrigerator and microwave when the metal top is removed.
The glass jars are the perfect vehicle for storing soups and sauces, and grains. They also allow you make a salad complete with the dressing and not let it get soggy. You can actually pack a few lunches in advance, and store them in the fridge until you are ready to eat them. The trick is the order in which you layer the ingredients in the jar.

First, add the dressing. It might be a tablespoon or two, or even more, depending on how much dressing you like and how big the salad is.

Next, layer the heaviest ingredients on top of it, that will not absorb the dressing. This means items like carrots, cucumbers, celery, and beets.

Add any grains, pasta or beans on top of that.

Next up is the protein layer, containing any chicken, meat, fish, hard boiled eggs, tofu or cheese.  Don’t add these yet if the salad is going to sit for several days. We recommend adding it within 24 hours of eating for best, freshest results.

Any soft vegetables and fruits such as avocado, tomatoes, or berries go on next. Again, if you are keeping the salad for several days, add these at the last minute. Avocado or apple should be soaked in lemon juice to avoid it turning brown.

Add any nuts, croutons or seeds in the next layer, followed by a hefty helping of clean and well dried greens. Screw on the lid, pop it in the refrigerator and anticipate lunch!

Chopped Salad

When ready to eat the salad, give it a little shake and dump it into a bowl. The lettuce will be on the bottom, and the other items on top of it. The dressing will mix in as it is poured. Enjoy!

Photo: top: POPSUGAR

bottom: Glasshouse Images

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Unrecipe of the Week: Cauliflower Rice

October 1, 2014

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Cauliflower is the chameleon of vegetables. We have mashed it instead of potatoes with great success, and have used it to create a crust for pizza. It is delicious roasted, and makes a creamy soup that doesn’t require any cream.

Tonight, cauliflower is sitting in as rice to become layered with a spicy, saucy chicken dish. It’s an easy substitution, resembling rice in color and texture, while saving about 220 calories per cup.

Cauliflower Rice:

Wash one head of cauliflower, and break it into florets. Allow it to dry.

Place the florets into the food processor and pulse until they resemble the consistency of rice. It is best to do this in 2 or 3 batches so they don’t get too finely minced.

Cook your “rice” either by steaming it briefly, with very little liquid, or by sautéing it in a little butter or olive oil for about 4-5 minutes until cooked through and slightly browned, but not mushy. You can doctor it up by adding a little sautéed onion and garlic, and a little chicken stock for flavor. Use as you would rice, and enjoy!

photo:Glasshouse Images

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Kitchen Tips Tuesday: Sprouted Garlic

March 25, 2014

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We were always under the impression that once  garlic had sprouted, it was on its way out. Those green shoots were a supposed indication that the garlic had passed its prime, accompanied by the ominous warning that sprouted garlic was the cause of nasty morning-after garlic breath.

A recent study published in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry suggests that those green sprouts may be actually be filled with heart healthy antioxidants.

After researchers in Korea (a country that knows their garlic!) observed the growth in old heads of garlic for five days, they concluded that the seedlings contained new compounds to protect the plant against pathogens. These compounds also increased the antioxidant levels in the older bulbs.

No word on whether or not the age of the garlic has any effects on the breath issue.

Sprouting carrots, onions, chickpeas, beans and wheat may also be safe to eat, as long as they are not beginning to soften. Potatoes however, are considered poisonous once they begin to sprout, or form “eyes,” and should be avoided.

photo: Glasshouse Images

Fresh Fast Food Revolution

February 7, 2014

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Eating well on the fly isn’t easy. Fast food and vending machine choices tend be high in fat, sugar, and sodium, and low in quality and nutritional value. Luke Sanders agrees, and he set out to do something about it. His latest venture, Farmer’s Fridge, is a kiosk filled with fresh, organic and where possible, local food that is as good for you, and the environment, as it tastes.

The company fills the refrigerated kiosk daily, with fresh salads which are  high on both flavor and nutrition. Super foods, nuts and seeds are incorporated into the mix. Best of all, they are packaged in BPA and phthalate free, fully recyclable jars. The ingredients are layered  to keep them from getting soggy. At the end of the day, the product is discounted, and the remaining salads are donated to local food pantries.

The concept is sure to revolutionize the fast food market. While the only one is at the Garvey Food Court in the Chicago area, watch for future kiosks to emerge in other cities across the country.

A Delicious Summer Dinner

July 1, 2012

Here it is… our fresh, local and incredibly simple dinner!

Grilled shrimp, brushed with  a puree of garlic, basil and oil :

Tomato salad with torn fresh basil, salt, pepper, olive oil and a squirt of lemon juice:

Oven roasted radishes, with a hint of tarragon:

It just goes to show you that fresh, pure food doesn’t take much else to turn it into a healthy and  delicious meal!

All this great food and what do you think Miss B ate?

I guess there is no accounting for taste!

photos: Spencer Jones / Glasshouse Images

Unrecipe Of The Week

July 22, 2009

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With summer finally here, I have been obsessed with tomatoes. The markets are filled with a vast selection of rich ripe tomatoes, from the traditional beefsteak and plum varieties, to the more unique heirloom tomatoes that grow in beautiful colors of red, yellow, green, orange and purple. Try this simple “unrecipe” for a great salad, or as a topping for fish, chicken or pasta.

Select a variety of tomatoes, and cut them into chunks.

Drizzle with olive oil and a little lemon juice.

Season with sea salt and freshly ground pepper.

Sprinkle with fresh basil cut in thin strips.

Enjoy!

photo: Spencer Jones / Glasshouse Assignment

Pure Food Diet Challenge

July 15, 2009

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What if you challenged yourself to eat only pure foods prepared in the simplest possible way?
In a world where everything has been processed, blended and mutated to create something else, it is refreshing to eat in the way nature intended. The idea is to eat only what can be eaten in it’s purist and most singular form; fruits and vegetables, fish, chicken, meat, eggs, and nuts.
Milk, but not cheese or yoghurt. Simple grains, but no pasta, bread or baked goods. It’s all right to cook your food, just keep in its most singular form.
It’s not to say that there aren’t many healthful foods that require some modification to create them. But, in going back to eating food in its purist possible form, you are able to taste the rich flavors of green market tomatoes, ripe sweet fruit, and fresh aromatic herbs.
Try it … just this week, and see how wonderful you feel. See how your body reacts to whole, fresh foods. You might find the results surprising!
Take the challenge, and let us know what you think.

photo: Spencer Jones/ Glasshouse Images


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