Posts Tagged ‘white wine’

Unrecipe of the Week: Chicken in Tomato Tarragon Sauce

February 1, 2016

Lately, I am facing the ultimate dilemma; trying to eat clean, and longing for something warm, hearty and a little more comforting. When I saw a photo of this on the New York Times cooking site, I knew I had to try it. It was quick, healthy and full of flavor, taking those boring chicken breasts to a better place. The sauce is good enough to eat with a spoon, and was perfect over pasta for the non-carb deprived members of the family. This one may become part of my regular dinner rotation this winter!

Photo via The New York Times

Photo via The New York Times

Chicken Breast In a Tomato Tarragon Sauce: (adapted from Pierre Franey)

Heat olive oil in a saute pan, and add 4 skinless, boneless chicken breasts. Season with salt and pepper and saute for about 3 minutes on each side to brown, turning often.

Add a large diced shallot or two, and a few diced garlic cloves to the pan and saute quickly. Add a handful of chopped fresh tarragon (or 2 teaspoons of dried tarragon), 1/4 cup of red wine vinegar, 1/4 cup of drained capers, 1 cup of dry white wine and a couple of big squirts of tomato paste. Bring to a boil and reduce the heat to a simmer.  Add a can of drained, chopped tomatoes(or pureed tomatoes for a saucier dish), and continue to simmer covered, for about 8-10 more minutes. Serve over pasta or zucchini noodles and enjoy!

Check us out at indigojonesnyc on instagram.

Want to see what we have been pinning? Take a look at our Pinterest page!

Tweet along on Twitter.

Take a peek at our Tumblr.

To keep up with the latest, show us some “like” by liking our Facebook page

Check out our new site Indigo Jones Eats

Visit our shops on Gourmly EcohabitudeLemonbar and Etsy

Download the HOMEMADE app

Advertisements

All The Rest is Gravy

November 26, 2014

A good gravy goes hand in hand with a beautiful roasted turkey. We get rave reviews for this one, made with the pan juices, and a little help from some pantry items.

4093600270

Mushroom Gravy:

Pour the pan juices from the turkey in a bowl, scraping any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Strain them into a glass measuring cup, and add 1/2 cup of white wine, and enough stock to measure 6 cups in total.

Sauté 2 pounds of sliced mushrooms until they are golden brown and the juice has evaporated. It will take about 15-20 minutes. Mix in reserved garlic herb paste, and sprinkle with about 1/3 cup of flour. Toss to incorporate the flour, so lumps will not form when the liquid is added. Whisk in the broth/pan juices and bring to a boil. Continue whisking as it thickens. Season to taste with salt and pepper, and enjoy!

photo: Glasshouse Images

Check us out at indigojonesnyc on instagram.

Want to see what we have been pinning? Take a look at our Pinterest page!

Tweet along on Twitter.

To keep up with the latest, show us some “like” by liking our Facebook page

Kitchen Tips Tuesday: How to Chill Wine Quickly

September 16, 2014

4093601213

Sometimes we want a glass of nice, cold chardonnay, and we want it NOW. Chilling wine quickly isn’t as difficult as it sounds.
Place the wine bottle into a metal bucket, fill it with ice and cold water, and toss in a big handful of salt. The salt will lower the freezing point of the water, making it colder, faster. After about 6 minutes, your wine should be sufficiently chilled and ready to drink.

Salud!

photo: Glasshouse Images

How to Roast the Perfect Turkey

November 27, 2013

7091300442

I always hear people say they don’t like turkey. They describe it as dry, tasteless and lackluster. I always tell them they haven’t had my turkey yet!

It’s not that I am the best cook in America…nor is it due to a secret recipe. It is due to a great technique perfected over the years, and even more so to the quality of the bird itself. I get mine from DiPaola Turkey Farms, based out of Trenton, New Jersey, and sold at the Union Square Greenmarket. The turkeys are fresh, never frozen, and raised in a humane environment. Since buying from them each year, my turkey score has gone from very good, to great. The price is high, but the results are worth every penny!

Start with a cool, but not icy cold turkey. Rinse the bird, remove all of the innards ( the liver, neck and giblets are often stored in the cavity of the bird in a little bag. Be sure to remove them before cooking!!!) Pat dry and place on a rack in a heavy roasting pan. It’s easier to clean later, if you spray the pan and rack with cooking spray first.

Place a cut onion, 2 stalks of celery and 1 large carrot cut into chunks in the bottom of the pan.

turkeys, traditions, Thanksgiving, ovens

Season the turkey with salt and pepper and rub the bird all over with  roasted garlic and herb butter, being sure to loosen the skin and rub some underneath it, and inside the cavity, reserving some to use in the gravy. Stuff if desired, and stuff a little ball of foil into the edge of the cavity to keep the stuffing from falling out. Tuck the wings under the legs if you can.

Boil 1 cup of dry white wine and 1 cup of chicken broth, and pour it into the pan. Roast for 1 hour at 350 degrees. Cover the breast loosely with foil so they do not brown too quickly, and roast another hour. Continue to pour 1 cup of broth and 1 cup of wine over the bird every hour until cooked through. Roast uncovered for the last hour to make sure the skin gets golden brown. The turkey should register 175 degrees when a meat thermometer is inserted in to the thickest part of the thigh. Remove it from the oven and allow it to rest covered, for 30 minutes before carving. It will continue to cook slightly while resting.

The rule of thumb for turkey roasting times:

Roast for about 15 minutes per pound if it is unstuffed, and a few minutes longer per pound if it is stuffed. The internal temperature of the thigh should be 175 degrees, and the stuffing should reach an internal temperature of 165 degrees. Our 18-19 pound bird takes about 4 hours and 15 minutes unstuffed, and about 4 hours and 45 minutes stuffed. Do not rely on the pop up times inserted in many turkeys. They often don’t pop until the turkey is already over cooked. Invest in a good digital meat thermometer for a more accurate and safe reading. A free range turkey will roast much faster than a previously frozen one, so start checking it after a few hours to make sure it is not cooking too fast.

Once the turkey is resting on the carving board under aluminum foil, its time to make the gravy. Pour any pan juices into a bowl and scrape the brown bits from the pan. Strain the juices and add 1/2 cup of wine and enough chicken broth to it, until you have about 6 cups of liquid.

Heat butter in a large skillet, and saute 2 pounds of sliced mushrooms until brown, about 18 minutes. ( You can do this earlier and just reheat them in the pan when you are ready.)

Mix in more of the garlic and herb butter. Sprinkle the mixture with 1/3 cup of flour and stir until the flour begins to brown. This will integrate it into the mushroom mixture, and avoid lumps later. Gradually whisk in the reserved liquid until it comes to a boil and thickens to the desired consistency. Season to taste with salt and pepper, and serve with the turkey.

Enjoy!

Photo of our Thanksgiving turkey from Spencer Jones/ Glasshouse Images

The Better Way to Chill White Wine

June 6, 2013

4093601213

Admit it: Have you ever put ice cubes in your wine to chill it? It is deemed tacky in most circles, but warm white wine just isn’t an option.

While putting the bottle in an ice bath helps speed the process, sometimes you need a little something on a super hot day to keep it cold. Here are a few “high brow” suggestions for chilling your wine, because hey, we’re classy like that:

If you have a little extra wine at the end of the evening, use it make ice cubes. They won’t dilute your drink and can also be tossed into sauces for a last minute addition. If you frequently sip a certain type of white wine, it could be worth investing in an extra bottle for this purpose.

Freeze some grapes for a pretty, and practical variation. Strawberries or raspberries work well too!

Keep some wine glasses in the freezer, so you will always have a cold one on hand.

As a last resort, toss a glass of white wine into the cocktail shaker with ice, and stain it back into the glass. No one is the wiser, and your drink will be cold.

Now sit back, and enjoy!

photo: Glasshouse Images

Like us on Facebook, follow us on TwitterTumblr and Pinterest too!

Unrecipe of the Week: Mustard Chicken

March 13, 2013

This is a great weekday dish, that is full of flavor and quick to prepare. While butter and cream can make it extra delicious, a lightened up version using olive oil and half and half tastes pretty yummy too! Pick your degree of richness, and your fresh herb of choice, because hey, that’s why we call it an “unrecipe”.
4093601369

Chicken Breasts With Mustard Sauce

Season boneless, skinless chicken breasts with salt and pepper and saute them in olive oil or butter ( or a combination of the two) on both sides, until browned and cooked through. Remove from the pan and place the chicken in the oven to keep warm.

Add a chopped shallot to the pan and saute until transparent. Scrape the shallots and the brown bits from the bottom of the pan, and sprinkle it with flour.  Stir the flour until blended, and add about 3/4 cup chicken broth, 1/4 cup half and half or cream, and about a 1/2 cup white wine (or champagne if you happen to have some open!) and whisk, allowing the mixture to thicken, but stay smooth and lump free. If it gets too thick, add more wine or broth. Mix in a couple of tablespoons of dijon mustard, and some fresh herbs of your choice. Tarragon, thyme or rosemary are all good options. Put the chicken breasts back into the pan, and allow to simmer for a few minutes to start to absorb the flavors of the sauce.
Place the chicken on a plate, and pour the sauce over it. Garnish it with a sprig of fresh herbs if you are feeling fancy, and enjoy!

photo: Glasshouse Images

A Delicious Summer Dinner

July 1, 2012

Here it is… our fresh, local and incredibly simple dinner!

Grilled shrimp, brushed with  a puree of garlic, basil and oil :

Tomato salad with torn fresh basil, salt, pepper, olive oil and a squirt of lemon juice:

Oven roasted radishes, with a hint of tarragon:

It just goes to show you that fresh, pure food doesn’t take much else to turn it into a healthy and  delicious meal!

All this great food and what do you think Miss B ate?

I guess there is no accounting for taste!

photos: Spencer Jones / Glasshouse Images


%d bloggers like this: