Posts Tagged ‘rice’

Kitchen Tips Tuesday: Rinsing Rice and Grains

August 8, 2017

When cooking rice and grains, most people just put them in a pot with the requisite liquid and follow the directions for cook time. There is a crucial step that is often over looked, and that is rinsing.

Rinsing grains dates back to a time and place when they weren’t processed and boxed like they are today. While most grains purchased in the USA aren’t considered toxic, they could benefit from a good rinse.

Rice: Giving rice a rinse takes off some of the surface starch, resulting in a less sticky end product. Many also notice debris in the rinse water, especially when the rice came from the bulk bins rather than a box. Imported rices, such as basmati and jasmine may have talc, or powdered glucose on them to make them appear cleaner looking. Looking cleaner, and being cleaner are two very different things, and it is advisable to rinse the talc off before cooking.

Other grains, such as quinoa, farro and barley benefit from a rinse, not only to remove debris, but to remove any saponins that may still linger. While domestically packaged quinoa has been treated to remove the dangerous coating, residual saponins are the source of the unpleasant and bitter flavor that sometimes occurs in cooking quinoa.

Rinse the grains either by running them under water in a fine mesh sieve, or by submerging them in cool water, straining them, and resubmerging them in fresh water until no more debris floats to the surface.

Soaking grains (and legumes) cuts down on the phytic acid, a compound which can make these foods harder to digest. Soaking also jumpstarts the process, cuts down on cooking time and tends to yield a better texture.

Taking the time to rinse grains is akin to taking the time to rinse vegetables. Well worth the extra few minutes for a safer, and better outcome.

photo: Glasshouse Images

SaveSave

Advertisements

Sustainable, Biodegradible and EDIBLE?!

March 28, 2016

Hero-Edible-Spoons-Bakeys-Biodegradable-Cutlery-Silverware-Ecofriendly-Utensils

Take out food is a huge business in big cities, and with that comes disposable containers, cutlery and napkins. That one-time-use plastic cutlery may spend a matter of minutes transporting food from plate ( also made of plastic) to mouth, but it will live a lifetime in a landfill. Some work has been done to create biodegradable disposable utensils, but what if there was a better idea?
Narayana Peesapaty, of Hyderabad, India has come up with a product that is not only earth friendly, but is also edible.

Bakeys are disposable utensils made from a mixture of rice, millet and sorghum, which are baked dry and formed into spoons. Sorghum is one of the most sustainable crops, using less land water to grow than rice or corn. It is also able to grow in 95% of the world’s arable land. For the energy expended to produce one plastic spoon, Bakeys can product 100 sorghum based spoons. Even if the diner chooses not to eat the utensil, it degrades quickly, leaving no major environmental impact behind.

Currently the spoons come in three flavors; plain, sweet and spicy. There are plans afoot to produce plates, forks, knives and chopsticks, as well as new flavors.

The company’ s kickstarter campaign has raised over $79,000 so far, against their goal of $20,000, with 19 days to go.

Brilliant.

photo: Tasting Table

Video: Bakey’s 

Check us out at indigojonesnyc on instagram.

Want to see what we have been pinning? Take a look at our Pinterest page!

Tweet along on Twitter.

Take a peek at our Tumblr.

To keep up with the latest, show us some “like” by liking our Facebook page

Check out our new site Indigo Jones Eats

Visit our shops on Gourmly EcohabitudeLemonbar and Etsy

Download the HOMEMADE app

Starch We Can’t Resist

May 20, 2015
Vermicelli nests

Vermicelli nests

I tend to avoid refined carbs as much as possible. It’s not easy. Especially when I love pasta, potatoes, bread and dessert. The hard cold reality is that those foods don’t love me back. Everytime I indulge a little, the dial on the scale goes up, and a little spare tire instantly appears around my midsection.

When I read an article in Prevention about resistant starches, I admit I got a bit excited.

Resistant starches have the chemical structure of starch, but act like fiber, in that they pass through our colon undigested. Our bodies can’t convert them to energy, so they become calorie free. Resistant starches are naturally found in many foods, including lentils, black beans, green peas, oats, and barley. Research has found that resistant starch enriched foods were responsible for an 8%-45% reduction in fat in an animal test group. Most of the fat loss came from visceral fat, or the dangerous fat that surrounds the internal organs. A human study revealed increased fat burning of 20%-25% when resistant starches were consumed.They have also been linked to lowering blood sugar, helping digestion, and reducing appetite.

Roseval potatoes

Roseval potatoes

The catch? How you prepare the foods, effects the levels of resistant starches. Cooking, and then cooling potatoes or rice, for example, has been shown to increase the levels of resistant starch, where allowing a green banana to ripen, decreases the benefits.

While there is not enough research yet to prove its effects, it could be the next big thing in weight management.

Head over to Authority Nutrition for more detailed information.

Related article: Like White on Rice

photo: Glasshouse Images

Check us out at indigojonesnyc on instagram.

Want to see what we have been pinning? Take a look at our Pinterest page!

Tweet along on Twitter.

Take a peek at our Tumblr.

To keep up with the latest, show us some “like” by liking our Facebook page

Check out our new site Indigo Jones Eats

Like White on Rice

March 27, 2015

 

1876300070_comp

A scientist from Sri Lanka has discovered a way to drastically reduce the calories in white rice, through a cooking technique.

Dr. Pushparajah Thavarajah and his student Sudhair James claim that adding coconut oil to the cooking water can alter the digestable starchy components of rice, resulting in a significant reduction in calories.

Apparently, the oil reacts with the starch in the rice, changing its structure. Chilling the rice helps foster the conversion of the starches, which remains even when the rice is reheated.

We don’t know if the technique really works or not, but it certainly is worth a try.

The experts suggest adding 3% of the weight of the rice in coconut oil to the boiling water before adding the rice. Once the rice is cooked, it can be chilled to further the process of converting the starches.
Rice made in advance can be reheated, without affecting the results.

Future studies with bread are underway.

photo: Glasshouse Images

Check us out at indigojonesnyc on instagram.

Want to see what we have been pinning? Take a look at our Pinterest page!

Tweet along on Twitter.

Take a peek at our Tumblr.

To keep up with the latest, show us some “like” by liking our Facebook page

Check out our new site Indigo Jones Eats

Kitchen Tips Tuesday: Funnels

February 3, 2015

4552300422_comp

Funnels are a useful kitchen tool, but one that not all of us have. I mean, how often do you use a funnel?
No worries! There are several options that you do have laying around the house.

When looking to transfer something like rice, or beans into a smaller container, or even pour flour into the running mixer, simply take a clean envelope and cut a hole in the corner, just large enough for the item to pass through.

For oil, or liquid items, roll a piece of parchment paper into a cone, and set the small end into the cup or bottle you are transfering to. Small quantities of liquids shouldn’t soak through paper, if you pour carefully. This also works for dry ingredients.

If you have a wider opening in your container, pour the ingredients into a pitcher, and then slowly pour from there.

When you’re done, toss the faux funnel into the trash, and enjoy your mess-free kitchen counters.

photo: Glasshouse Images

Check us out at indigojonesnyc on instagram.

Want to see what we have been pinning? Take a look at our Pinterest page!

Tweet along on Twitter.

Take a peek at our Tumblr.

To keep up with the latest, show us some “like” by liking our Facebook page

Check out our new site Indigo Jones Eats

Unrecipe of the Week: Cauliflower Rice

October 1, 2014

4251800056

Cauliflower is the chameleon of vegetables. We have mashed it instead of potatoes with great success, and have used it to create a crust for pizza. It is delicious roasted, and makes a creamy soup that doesn’t require any cream.

Tonight, cauliflower is sitting in as rice to become layered with a spicy, saucy chicken dish. It’s an easy substitution, resembling rice in color and texture, while saving about 220 calories per cup.

Cauliflower Rice:

Wash one head of cauliflower, and break it into florets. Allow it to dry.

Place the florets into the food processor and pulse until they resemble the consistency of rice. It is best to do this in 2 or 3 batches so they don’t get too finely minced.

Cook your “rice” either by steaming it briefly, with very little liquid, or by sautéing it in a little butter or olive oil for about 4-5 minutes until cooked through and slightly browned, but not mushy. You can doctor it up by adding a little sautéed onion and garlic, and a little chicken stock for flavor. Use as you would rice, and enjoy!

photo:Glasshouse Images

Like us on Facebook, follow us on TwitterTumblr, Instagram and Pinterest too!

Kitchen Tips Tuesday: Cleaning a Coffee Grinder

May 13, 2014

1822600034

Coffee grinders are great for grinding coffee beans, but they are also useful for grinding herbs and spices. The only problem is, who wants turmeric scented coffee? Or coffee scented oregano? Get the picture?
Help is on the way! In between uses, toss in some uncooked rice and grind it up until the grinder is odor free. For particularly pungent smells, change the rice and grind again.

photo: Glasshouse Images

Unrecipe of the Week

July 29, 2009

2117900178 HorizontalI love simple side dishes that pack lots of fresh seasonal flavors. This easy rice dish is enhanced with shallots, corn and the zing of fresh, aromatic mint.

Rice with Corn, Shallots and Mint:

Cook brown rice according to package instructions

Sauté corn kernels (OK, big confession: I use frozen corn here. It’s still healthy and way easier than cutting the kernels off the cob!!!) and a few shallots, sliced very thin in butter until the corn is cooked. This should only take a few minutes at medium heat.

Mix corn, shallots and rice together in a large serving bowl.

Mix in chopped mint leaves.

Serve warm or at room temperature.

Enjoy!

photos: Glasshouse Images

2117900123mint small


%d bloggers like this: