Posts Tagged ‘yogurt’

Unrecipe of the Week: Eggplant With Yogurt + Pomegranate Seeds

October 19, 2016

epicurious

Last week, I was looking for a few great side dishes that were hearty enough, and interesting enough for a vegetarian to eat in lieu of the racks of lamb that I was serving to the carnivores. After searching through famed chef Yotam Ottolenghi’s book “Plenty,” I stumbled upon his recipe for roasted eggplant with a buttermilk yogurt sauce, topped with za’atar and pomegranate seeds. It fit all of my criteria and then some. It was special enough to stand on it’s own. It had seasonal elements, was healthy, and full of flavor. The cool buttermilk yogurt sauce was smooth and creamy against the texture of the roasted eggplant, and the pomegranate added a touch of sweet crunch. The fact that it came together quickly was a bonus. It’s no wonder that Mr. Ottolenghi chose this for the cover recipe of his book!

roasted eggplant

roasted eggplant

Roasted Eggplant With Buttermilk Sauce adapted from “Plenty”:

Split 4 small eggplants vertically. Brush with olive oil until the pieces are fully saturated. The oil eggplant will absorb the oil, so be liberal with it. Sprinkle the halves with thyme leaves and salt and pepper. Roast in a 350-400 degree oven for about 30 minutes until the flesh is soft and they are nicely browned. Allow them to cool slightly.

For the sauce, whisk together 1/2 cup of Greek yogurt with about 8 or 9 tablespoons of buttermilk and 1 1/2 tablespoons of olive oil. Stir in 1 clove of garlic, minced as finely as possible, or pressed in a garlic press, and a pinch of salt.

To serve, spoon the sauce over the eggplant halves, sprinkle them with za’atar* and pomegranate seeds. Drizzle with olive oil and enjoy!

*Za’atar is a Middle Eastern spice mix. It is available at specialty markets, and it is also easy to make at home.

Za’atar:

Combine about 1 tablespoon each of oregano, ground cumin, salt, pepper, and sesame seeds. Many people also use sumac, but I didn’t have any and I didn’t miss it!

Photo: top: Epicurious | bottom: indigo jones

Check us out at indigojonesnyc on instagram.

Want to see what we have been pinning? Take a look at our Pinterest page!

Tweet along on Twitter.

To keep up with the latest, show us some “like” by liking our Facebook page

Check out our new site Indigo Jones Eats

Visit our shops on Gourmly ,EcohabitudeChocolate.org and Etsy

Advertisements

Kitchen Tips Tuesday: Buttermilk

March 10, 2015

4093601900_comp

What do you do if a recipe calls for buttermilk, and you don’t have any?
Do you frantically dash to the store and get some? Calm down. There is no need to make the trek to the store if you have the ingredients to make your own.

Buttermilk adds an acidity to batters and reacts with the baking soda or powder to create airy, fluffy and tender baked goods.

To make a good substitute, add a tablespoon of plain white vinegar or lemon juice to a scant cup of milk and let it sitat room temperature

for 5 to 10 minutes. The lemon or vinegar will begin to curdle the milk, and it will thicken slightly. If you use a heavier dairy product, like half and half or cream, the end result will be thicker than if you use regular milk.

Another option is to thin out plain yogurt or sour cream with one part water to three parts dairy. For instance, 3/4 cup of yogurt, thinned with one quarter cup of water. Stir until it reaches a more liquid consistency, and use in place of buttermilk in recipes.

photo: Glasshouse Images

Check us out at indigojonesnyc on instagram.

Want to see what we have been pinning? Take a look at our Pinterest page!

Tweet along on Twitter.

Take a peek at our Tumblr.

To keep up with the latest, show us some “like” by liking our Facebook page

Check out our new site Indigo Jones Eats

The Skinny On Full Fat Dairy

March 26, 2014

4093601338

I only eat fat free dairy products.  I use skim milk in my coffee, and eat 0% Greek yogurt for breakfast. I do this mainly because I always do. I have been conditioned to think that fat is bad for you, and the reduction in calories from fat free products is a good thing. Also, I am perfectly satisfied with the taste and consistency, so I don’t even think to try a richer, higher fat version.

Until now. A recent study at Washington State University analyzed 400 samples of organic and conventional milk over an 18 month period and found that the organic milk contained significantly more heart healthy omega-3s than it’s conventional counterpart. It also found that whole milk had an even higher amount of omega-3s than reduced fat versions. Hmmm.

The vitamins in milk, especially vitamins A and D are fat soluble, which means they require fat to be absorbed into the body. Omega 3s are a fatty acid, so it should come as no surprise that more of them would appear in full fat milk. According to the study, the whole milk contained 50% more omega-3s than 2% milk, and 66% more than 1% milk.

The other interesting fact is the levels of omega-6 fatty acids in conventional milk were extremely high, due to the corn and grain intensive diet fed to conventional cows, vs. the mostly grass fed diet of organic cows.

Omega-6 acids promote cell rigidity and help our blood to clot by triggering an inflammatory reaction in our bodies. They are also involved in fat storage.  Omega-3 acids help calm inflammation, promote cell permeability, and metabolize glucose. While we need to have both of these in our diets, the ratio of omega -3 to omega-6 should be about 1 to 1. Due to the amount of corn and soybean oils found in many commercial products consumed in the United States, the amount of inflammatory omega-6s are much higher.

While the Department of Agriculture and other food and nutrition experts have yet to change their tune on fat in dairy products, researchers hope that this information will trigger new ways of thinking about fats in general.

photo:Glasshouse Images

Like us on Facebook, follow us on TwitterTumblr, Instagram and Pinterest too!

 

Kitchen Tips Tuesday: Burn Treatments

June 11, 2013

As a continuation of my series of “Unfortunate Events”, I spent a few days last week in the Cornell Burn Unit at New York Hospital.  I know what you are thinking: Yes, I did just finish physical therapy on a fractured knee. Mmmhmm, I did hurt my foot after a triumphant return to the gym and taking my mileage from the recommended “walk a minute/ run a minute” to running 3 miles straight in the course of a week.
All of that is better now thank you, but last week I did a doozy of a job burning my hand. I will spare you the gory details, and trust me they are quite gory, but after a few days of pretending it was all fine, I ended up at the doctor, the emergency room and yet another emergency room, before finally being admitted to the hospital.

ZC8X8120 SH Hosp Bedmail

I burn myself a lot. As anyone who cooks like I do will tell you, burns are a part of the process. I inevitably have a couple of little marks on my arms as reminders of great meals past.

This one however, was more serious.

The moral of the story, is that if you have an injury that is large, extreme and doesn’t stop hurting/bleeding/swelling/oozing, do as I say, not as I do, and head to the doctor immediately. Many ERs now have a fast track area that deals with these non-life threatening emergencies that require treatment that often can’t be provided by your local doctor. (IV antibiotics, X-rays and MRI’s, wound treatment and stitches: you get the idea!) The first visit had me in and out in 45 minutes, a world record for a New York City ER.  If you think it might be serious, go see a doctor!!

Today’s kitchen tips are for those little pesky burns that don’t require either hospitalization or shots of morphine just to take a shower and get them bandaged (for reals!).  These are quick remedies often found in the kitchen to soothe those mildly singed areas and help prevent scarring or infection.

1635400061

A teabag can act as a soothing compress, and the tannic acid present in black tea helps to draw the heat from the burn. Soaking a teabag in cool water and applying it directly to the area should provide some relief. Some advocate using the tea leaves as a poultice, and dabbing them directly on the burn before covering the area with gauze.

4093601587

When honey is applied to a burn, it draws out fluids from the affected area, and acts as a disinfectant. It also keeps the skin soft, and supple as it heals.
Apply honey to the wound, and cover it with a gauze bandage. Change the bandage several times throughout the day.

Vinegar has antiseptic properties that can cleanse the burn and help dull the pain. Mix equal parts vinegar and water, and use it clean the area. Placing a cloth soaked in the mixture directly on the wound is said to help ease the pain.

4263000298

Rubbing a raw potato over a burn is said to reduce pain and prevent blisters. Apply the cut side to the burn immediately, for optimum effects.

Milk is another food with soothing properties.  Soaking the affected area in milk or plain yogurt is recommended to take the burn out of the wound. Repeat every few hours, being sure to use fresh dairy products each time.

4093601212

Freshly cut onions are also thought to be a good treatment, as the quercetin and sulphur compounds help to relieve the pain, and prevent blistering. Work quickly, as the onion loses its medicinal properties soon after it is cut. You may not smell very good, but people swear by the results!

Remember to keep the burn clean, and moist at all times. The doctors at the Burn Unit I was in are big fans of Bacitracin, which keeps the wound clean, infection free, and moist while it heals. And hopefully, mine will!

Photos: Glasshouse Images

Like us on Facebook, follow us on TwitterTumblr and Pinterest too!

Waste Case Project: Day 4

March 29, 2012

Tonight was the big test…a whole roasted chicken! Every week, I buy a whole chicken, and of course we never finish it. I’m told that it is going to get eaten for lunch, but every Saturday, I throw away what is left. Today, I decided to take the “chicken challenge” and make sure it gets eaten. I personally packed up the leftovers, so that I could assess the remnants. There is a huge amount left, and easily enough for dinner tomorrow night. I bought 2 organic carrots and an onion, thinking I would make a small pot of chicken stock with the leftovers,and use up some herbs festering in the produce drawer. Will there be enough chicken left to bother, or will we actually eat it all? If I don’t make the stock, what becomes of the onion and carrots? A new dilemma!

I cleaned and chopped all the lettuce I bought, including the arugula that is miraculously still hanging in there after a few days, and put what I didn’t think we needed in a plastic bag with a paper towel in it to absorb the moisture. There is plenty for another meal,and the work is already done for me!

I even used a rubber spatula to get ALL the yogurt out of the container, instead of tossing those last few spoonfuls.

Awareness of the problem is proving to be half the battle for me. Planning for waste is helping me eliminate waste.

Stay tuned to find out what REALLY happens to that roasted chicken!

photo: Glasshouse Images


%d bloggers like this: