Posts Tagged ‘soup’

Kitchen Tips Tuesday: Parmesan Rinds

January 26, 2016

 

7091300065_comp

In our continuing quest to eliminate food waste, we’ve been saving the rinds from Parmesan cheese to add flavor to soups and stews.
This weekend, we were making our creamy cauliflower soup with parmesan crisps and realized that this was the perfect spot for those rinds. This  (un) recipe calls for adding a couple of tablespoons of grated parmesan cheese to the pot towards the end of cooking. Tossing in the rinds while it cooks instead, allows the cheese to slowly melt into the soup, delivery a savory and salty flavor.

The rinds can be kept in the freezer, and you can take out just enough to fill your needs.
Try tossing them into pasta sauces, ratatouille or vegetable soups.

Drop a rind into the sauce or soup while it is cooking, and allow the cheese to slowly melt into the dish. If there is still a solid portion when you’re ready to serve it, remove the rind and discard it.
Enjoy!

Photo: Glasshouse Images

Check us out at indigojonesnyc on instagram.

Want to see what we have been pinning? Take a look at our Pinterest page!

Tweet along on Twitter.

Take a peek at our Tumblr.

To keep up with the latest, show us some “like” by liking our Facebook page

Check out our new site Indigo Jones Eats

Visit our shops on Gourmly EcohabitudeLemonbar and Etsy

Download the HOMEMADE app

Unrecipe of the Week: Mushroom Soup

November 9, 2015

Even though the weather in New York has been balmy, I have been craving soup. It might be about seeking comfort more than warmth, but soup has been on my mind for a couple of weeks now. My mother sent me a recipe for mushroom soup that she had recently made, and I thought I would give it a try. That is, until I read it. The original recipe called for adding 10 tablespoons of flour and a whole stick of butter to the pot, to get a creamy texture without the cream. Thinking there was no way I was going to add a stick of butter to my soup, let alone all that flour, I set out to adapt the recipe to make it a bit cleaner. While I don’t know if it resembled the original, it definately tasted good enough to share.

4195000026_comp

Pureed Mushroom Soup:

Dice one onion, a couple of ribs of celery and a carrot or two. Clean and slice about 1 1/2 pounds of mushrooms. I used all conventional mushrooms, but next time I will try to mix in some shiitake and crimini mushrooms for a deeper flavor profile. Saute all of this in a little olive oil until slightly browned and the mushrooms have released all of their liquid, about 5-8 minutes.

Add about 10 cups of chicken or vegetable stock to the pot, and bring to a boil. Simmer, with the lid partially on for about 45 minutes. Add a few sage leaves and puree the mixture until smooth. Return the soup to the stove. Make a paste using a little of the hot soup and a couple of tablespoons of flour adding more liquid until it is smooth. Stir this into the pot of hot soup, and gently boil until it starts to thicken. I added just enough to get a silky consistency, but you can add more if you prefer an even thicker soup. Season with salt and pepper to taste, and enjoy!

Photo: Glasshouse Images

Check us out at indigojonesnyc on instagram.

Want to see what we have been pinning? Take a look at our Pinterest page!

Tweet along on Twitter.

Take a peek at our Tumblr.

To keep up with the latest, show us some “like” by liking our Facebook page

Check out our new site Indigo Jones Eats

Visit our shops on Gourmly and Etsy

Download the HOMEMADE app

 

Kitchen Tips Tuesday: Storing Produce

June 9, 2015

 

3555600993_comp

Summer time is produce time. Our cravings turn to green market fresh vegetables, and cool juicy fruits which grow at this time of year. What happens when the abundance of the season gets wilted and moldy before we have a chance to enjoy it?

Here are a few tips to keeping produce fresh:

Buy the freshest fruits and vegetables you can find. The farmer’s markets are a great source, since the produce is local and comes to us directly from the farm, rather than traveling for a week before it gets out on the floor of the grocery store. The fresher it is at the time of purchase, the longer it will last.

Keep produce dry. Many experts suggest washing and thouroughly drying fruits and vegetables, and storing them wrapped in paper towels to absorb any additional moisture. Strawberries can be either be washed and hulled before storing in an airtight container, or can be laid on paper towels in a single layer in the refrigerator, for those lucky enough to have the real estate.

Certain foods give off ethanol, which causes food to ripen. Keep those ripe bananas away from other fruits and vegetables, to keep them from over ripening and molding. Avocados are a prime candidate for going from rock hard to mush, missing that window when they are at their peak.

One bad apple, (or tomato, berry etc.) can spoil the whole bunch. Pick through and toss any soft or moldy items and rinse the rest well to keep it from spreading.

When the week is nearing an end, and there are lots of leftover vegetables sitting in the refrigerator ready to “kick the bucket” at any time, try making soup. Saute a diced onion in butter or olive oil. Add diced vegetables, and quickly brown them. Cover with broth ( vegetable or chicken) and simmer until they are soft. Season with salt and pepper, and herbs of your choice. Puree until smooth, and enjoy!

Photo:  Glasshouse Images

Check us out at indigojonesnyc on instagram.

Want to see what we have been pinning? Take a look at our Pinterest page!

Tweet along on Twitter.

Take a peek at our Tumblr.

To keep up with the latest, show us some “like” by liking our Facebook page

Check out our new site Indigo Jones Eats

Kitchen Tips Tuesday: The Chicken and The Hen

March 31, 2015

IMG_3933

Last week, I decided to make a pot of chicken soup. I asked my husband to go to the butcher to purchase a soup chicken, which is often an old hen. Respect your elders people, because you are about to hear a tale touting the superiority of the older female.

He ordered the soup chicken and the butcher asked if he wanted a regular chicken, or an old hen. Horrified by the thought of the latter, he opted for the chicken. After cooking the soup for several hours with lots of carrots, onions, parsley, parsnip and celery, the soup seemed thin and  a little bit on the bland side. I put it in jars in the freezer to use another time.

This week, he went back to the butcher and requested the old hen. Same vegetables, same cooking time. This pot of soup is so rich that it fully congealed after it was chilled. A thick layer of fat was skimmed off leaving me a deep golden soup that is full bodied. I placed it in the freezer next to the other stock, and the difference is boldly apparent.

Forgive the bad photo, but a picture paints a thousand words! The "hen" soup is on the left.

Forgive the bad photo, but a picture paints a thousand words! The “hen” soup is on the left.

The quality of the ingredients makes all the difference in the outcome of the dish. As a young cook, I thought that meant using an organic, free range chicken to make soup. I may have gotten the organic part right, but the free range chicken, while superior for eating, lacked the fat and meatiness of the aged hen, which can be a bit tough and stringy after cooking.

Should you make soup that turns out lackluster, there are a few things you can do to salvage it.

Reduce it: After straining out the meat and vegetables, boil the liquid until until it reduces by about 25% or more. This will obviously yield you less, but it will be more flavorful.

Cheat: Add some chicken bouillon and cook it for a bit. It will give you some taste, but may make it a bit salty. Look for the best boullion you can find. Whole Foods carries some that are low sodium and made of more natural ingredients. You can also mix some boxed chicken stock into it to give it more taste.

If it is really bland, freeze it in small containers and use it in place of cooking water for rice, vegetables and other things that might benefit from a little extra something. One man’s bland soup is another man’s tasty cooking water.

Enjoy!

Check us out at indigojonesnyc on instagram.

Want to see what we have been pinning? Take a look at our Pinterest page!

Tweet along on Twitter.

Take a peek at our Tumblr.

To keep up with the latest, show us some “like” by liking our Facebook page

Check out our new site Indigo Jones Eats

Unrecipe of the Week: White Bean Soup

January 2, 2014

Mojettes from Marais Poitevin

It’s a new year, and so far, it’s a cold one. Temperatures are expected to drop into the single digits in New York City,  and snow is on it’s way. I am craving warmth and comfort, and this soup should fit the bill.

It’s low in fat and calories, and high in protein and nutrients, thanks to the white beans, tomatoes and baby kale.

White Bean Soup

Rinse 1 can (or box: kudos Whole Foods for your new BPA free packaging!) of cannelinni beans and put them in a pot with about 6 cups of vegetable or chicken stock, a few springs of fresh thyme, rosemary and a few sage leaves. Add 2 crushed garlic cloves, and simmer for about 30 minutes or so. Add one 26 oz. can or box of chopped tomatoes with their juice, and continue to cook for another 30 minutes, uncovered. Remove the herbs and garlic cloves,  and add several handfuls of shredded baby kale. Cook another 15 minutes until the kale is softened. If at any point, the soup gets too thick, add more stock or water. Season to taste with salt and pepper. If you prefer a thick, smooth soup, you can puree it at this point.

When ready to serve, drizzle each bowl with olive oil, and sprinkle with Parmesan cheese. Enjoy!

photo: Glasshouse Images

Like us on Facebook, follow us on TwitterTumblr, Instagram and Pinterest too!

Unrecipe of the Week: Butternut Squash Soup

November 20, 2013

The weather is changing and winter is in the air. For me, that spells the beginning of soup season. I used to start Thanksgiving dinner with pumpkin or butternut squash soup. As the crowd grew, and the accompanying extra dishes grew, I pulled back. This year, I am craving a warm start to the meal, and this soup fills the bill. I will serve it in teacups, to prevent everyone from filling up before the main event!

4228000286

Although the “unrecipe” calls for butternut squash, feel free to substitute fresh pumpkin.

This recipe serves 4-6 people.

Savory Butternut Squash Soup:

Finely chop the white and light green part of one leek, and saute it in butter or olive oil, until softened but not browned. Add 3-4 pounds of butternut squash, peeled and cubed*,  1/4 teaspoon nutmeg, 2 tablespoons of curry powder, and  2 tablespoon of cumin, and continue to stir for a few minutes to allow the ingredients to merge. Season with salt and black pepper. Add a few tablespoons of Sherry, and cook long enough for it to evaporate into the mixture.

Add about 4 cups of chicken or vegetable stock, (enough to fully cover the squash), and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer, covered, for about 20 minutes until the squash is soft.

Puree the soup in a blender, or use an immersion blender until smooth. Add more stock if the soup is getting too thick. Taste, and correct seasonings if necessary. Stir in a little more Sherry if desired, when ready to serve.

Serve with a dollop of creme fraiche and enjoy!

* many specialty food markets, such as Whole Foods and Trader Joe’s have already peeled and cubed butternut squash, which makes this much easier to make!

photo: Glasshouse Images

Like us on Facebook, follow us on TwitterTumblr, Instagram and Pinterest too!

CSA Tuesday

November 7, 2012

It’s CSA day today.  Since fresh food is still not fully available in downtown Manhattan since the storm, this week’s produce share was highly anticipated.

We got a butternut squash, 4 onions, lettuce, collards, red radishes, black radishes, and sage.

I am not familiar with black radishes, so I am looking forward to experimenting with them.

Since the storm forced me to throw away several weeks worth of CSA soups from the freezer, I will be happy to make my next batch this weekend. Unless the squash becomes ravioli first, which would be lovely with a little sage butter. A lettuce salad with mixed radishes perhaps? That would leave just the collards, which are not a favorite around here.

Let’s see what happens as the week wears on..

Unrecipe of the Week

October 1, 2012

Often the simplest preparations are the best. That was certainly the case with Friday night’s squash soup.

It was a rainy evening in New York City and my vegetable basket was filled with random goodies; the perfect scenario for a warm, comforting soup.

I cut a butternut squash into large pieces, drizzled them with olive oil so they didn’t dry out, and roasted them in a hot oven for about 25-30 minutes, until they were soft and caramelized.

In the meantime, I sautéed an onion in a little olive oil and added the chunks of peeled and seeded pattypan squash.

I covered the vegetables with broth, (chicken or vegetable broth will do) and simmered it until the squash was soft.
I removed and discarded the skin from roasted butternut squash and added it to the pan.
After simmering it for another 10 minutes or so, I pureed it, using an immersion blender. Adding a little more broth to smooth out the consistency, and seasoning it with salt, pepper and a little cayenne pepper for a bit of heat and my soup was ready.

It was creamy, rich and flavorful without any cream, or butter. The taste was all about fresh, seasonal foods, prepared in a simple manner. It just doesn’t get any better than that!

Serve with a dollop of plain Greek yogurt and enjoy!

Unrecipe of the Week

September 23, 2009

Chicken Soup

1211500615.JPG

The first cold of the season has officially infiltrated our home, signaling the time is right for homemade chicken soup.
It’s simple to make, and soothes our stuffy noses and our soul.

Take a whole chicken and have it cut in quarters.

Put the chicken into a large stock pot, fill it 3/4 way up with water and bring it to a boil.

When the mixture starts to boil, skim off the foam that rises to the surface.

Add a large onion cut into quarters, a handful of parsley, and carrots, celery and one or 2 parsnips, all cut into 2″ chunks.

Add salt and pepper to taste.

Reduce the heat so that the soup is gently boiling.

Cook for 3 to 4 hours.

Strain the soup to remove all of the chicken and vegetables. Refridgerate the broth until the fat comes to the top and solidifies. Skim this off  before serving.

To serve, reheat the broth until boiling. Shred the chicken, discarding the skin and bones and add it to the soup. The carrots can be diced and added back in as well. Discard all of the other vegetables. Add cooked noodles or matza balls as desired,

The soup freezes well and can be used as needed. The plain broth is a great base for all kinds of other soups.

Enjoy!

Hint: Did you know that some chickens are better than others for soup making? Ask your butcher for a “soup chicken” which is specifically an older hen. Free range chickens, although great for roasting, don’t have enough fat to make a tasty soup.

photo: Glasshouse Images


%d bloggers like this: