Posts Tagged ‘social media’

Ranting and Raving: A Guide To Millenials in the Workplace

June 23, 2017

I recently stumbled upon a “diss site” where participants make snarky comments about a certain blogger. Most of it is in the name of entertainment, yet there is something a little disconcerting about devoting over 1900 pages to making fun of someone that you can simply not follow if you don’t like what they have to say.

The site in question had an employee to whom they gave a byline, and introduced to their readership. After about a year and a half of employment, where they all acted like BFFs, said employee was let go.
Fans flocked to her Instagram, where she long windily went on and on about how successful and happy she was post firing, and insinuated that the end of her employment was not pretty.

Fast forward to last week, when the former employee went off on a series of rants, literally trashing the blogger and her husband. She claims that she was let go for not staying in the office when her employers were away, and that her subordinate ratted her out. The rant has spanned over several days now, resulting in barrage of comments and support for her heroics, and the former subordinate having to take her own account private to avoid the hateful comments she was getting.

There are at least two sides to every story, and her former employers are remaining mum.

Fast forward to a few days into the rant, which is amazingly still going strong, and commenters are starting wonder if she is becoming a bit unhinged. A few sites have picked the story up, among them Jezebel, and it has only added fuel to her fire.

Perhaps it is because I am from another generation but it seems to me that she is acting out the typical negative millennial-in–the-workplace stereotype on steroids.

I would not hire this woman, no matter what her qualifications might be, under any circumstances, as I would fear that when, (not if) things didn’t go her way, my company would be the next victim of her social media vitriol.

Here are some of the most common (mis?) conceptions about millennial workers, how she is proving them right, and what you can do to dispel them.

PERCEPTION: “They have a sense of entitlement.”

This disgruntled ex- employee bristles when someone mentions entitlement. She talks about others being entitled, and how she got where she is on her own, thereby deserving more respect.

REALITY CHECK: Uh, no. Entitlement isn’t about family fortunes, or other’s helping you get a job. It is about your own inflated sense of what you are owed by society and your employers. Perhaps showing that you are a team player, respecting your employer’s wishes and paying your dues is a better approach. Age, title, and your own perception of your talent and contributions do not give you the right to do whatever you please, regardless of what your boss wants you to do, nor does it give you the right to publicly disparage them on social media. Show some respect for those around you with more experience and expertise, and you might just learn just something from them. 

PERCEPTION: “They expect a reward just for showing up.”

This is, in fact a generation that was praised and rewarded for every little thing, including getting a trophy for losing. This woman wanted the prize, but didn’t want to have to show up to get it.

REALITY CHECK: As managers, we need to recognize this phenomenon and offer frequent feedback, but as employees, they need to wake up to the fact that all of it may not be positive. That constructive feedback is what helps us learn, grow and become better at what we do. Welcome that information and use it, don’t rebel against it. Ironically, her former boss, only a couple of years her senior, is famous for scrubbing the comments section of her blog, keeping only the flattering ones, and deleting everything else. Our disgruntled ex-employee is not just deleting the less than encouraging feedback; she is publically lashing out against those who posted it.

PERCEPTION: “They expect special treatment and want to do everything their own way.”

The employee in question sees her firing as a direct result of disagreeing with her boss’ attendance policy, or as she so eloquently puts it, “ass-in-seat” requirements during business hours.
REALITY CHECK: Workplace flexibility to becoming more popular and allowing people to be assessed on the work they do, rather than their attendance is something managers should consider. That said, it is at the discretion of the manager, or the company’s policies, and many businesses need people on site to work as a part of a team, attend last minute meetings or be supervised to ensure that the work is being done as required. You don’t get to make those rules, your boss does.

PERCEPTION: “They are job hoppers and won’t be around for long.”

This woman has listed all of her jobs in her Instagram rant. At age 31, she has two full pages of jobs, indicating that she hasn’t stayed at many of them very long.REALITY CHECK: It is harder for a company to invest in someone whom they know is not likely stick around for very long. It is not your boss’ job to groom you for your next one. Show commitment to the company, the job and your manager, and they might be more willing to mentor you and offer you more exposure to next level opportunities.

PERCEPTION: “They are always on social media.”

Social media provided this woman with a voice and a platform to express herself. She didn’t use it to her best advantage.

REALTIY CHECK: Social media is not new, and it has far reaching benefits that older workers who eschew it might be missing out on. That said, what gets posted, regardless of whether or not it gets deleted, lives on forever, and can come back to bite you later. I have seen screen shots of this rant immortalized on other websites with large readerships. And frankly, she is starting to look like a lunatic. Where she may have begun as a hero and freedom fighter, even her most vehement supporters are starting to think she has gone too far. As one who mentioned ad nauseum, what a great and talented writer and content creator she is, her diatribe is repetitive, vindictive and rife with errors. She is not only burning bridges and setting a bad example on a very large platform where anyone and everyone might see it, she is not being the least bit articulate. Think before you post people! Would you want your perspective employer at your dream company to see this side of you? If she really wanted a public forum to express herself, wouldn’t a well-written essay, posted to a site like Medium, or even Facebook, be a better illustration of who you are and what you stand for, rather than a five days and counting, of an unfiltered and incoherent rant?

This outburst has gone from a little inappropriate venting, to a overwhelming barrage of negative thoughts. In an effort to assassinate the character of her former boss, she is now committing career suicide on her own. Although I have completely lost interest in anything she has left to say, I am interested in seeing how this plays out for her as she pursues other opportunities.

Please share your thoughts in the comments section, and tell us what your take is on millennials in the workplace, and what we can learn from them.

update: The “millennial in question’s” Instagram followers soared to 20k at the start of the rant, and almost a week later, she’s still at it, but with only 19.3k followers. It seems I am not the only one tiring of this tirade. It has however, earned her own spot on the diss site.

Photo: Glasshouse Images

Check us out at indigojonesnyc on instagram.

Want to see what we have been pinning? Take a look at our Pinterest page!

Tweet along on Twitter.

To keep up with the latest, show us some “like” by liking our Facebook page

Check out our new site Indigo Jones Eats

Visit our shops on Gourmly ,EcohabitudeChocolate.orgThe Foodworks,and Etsy

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

Advertisements

#tiedtogether

February 13, 2017
photo via Business of Fashion

photo via Business of Fashion

Fashion insiders will be donning white bandanas this fashion week, in a quiet show of solidarity, unity and inclusiveness.
The movement, started by The Business of Fashion website, asks that designers and show attendees participate in the initiative.

To get involved, simply tie a white bandana around your wrist, neck, head or bag and upload a selfie to social media with the hashtag #tiedtogether.

 

photo via Business of Fashion

photo via Business of Fashion

Designers are being urged to include the bandanas as an accessory in their show, and to wear one when taking their final bows, to spread the message throughout the month of international fashion weeks.

Intended to be a positive statement, not a political one, the creators hope to show support to human issues worldwide.

 

photo via Business of Fashion

photo via Business of Fashion

Stay tuned to see some style statements that could be the start of a major fashion trend.

Check us out at indigojonesnyc on instagram.

Want to see what we have been pinning? Take a look at our Pinterest page!

Tweet along on Twitter.

To keep up with the latest, show us some “like” by liking our Facebook page

Check out our new site Indigo Jones Eats

Visit our shops on Gourmly ,EcohabitudeChocolate.orgThe Foodworks,and Etsy

Haters Gonna Hate

November 22, 2016

4107300012_comp

A Facebook friend from my childhood posted what she thought was an innocuous yet extemely deragatory comment about Michelle Obama’s current Vogue cover. It incited a dialogue that was both bitter, and frightening at the same time. Those that agreed added their two cents in the same defamatory way, and those that disagreed practically ripped her head off. As I read the comments, the small voice in my head kept repeating,” don’t engage, don’t engage.” Yet, regardless of your political bent, she made a comment that was demeaning, rude and wrong on so many levels…about another woman who didn’t do anything to invite this vitriol.
I silently followed the thread throughout the evening, and picked it up again early in the morning. A few people commented to say goodbye, as they unfollowed her forever. A few encourged her. The only thing that was consistent was the hatred. This was not about reasoning, or objecting; this was two factions that were so fed up with one another, that they said exactly what they thought, without sugar coating a thing. I finally caved and simply stated my mantra that Michelle herself instilled in me a few months ago: “When they go low, we go high.”

Minutes later, the post was deleted.

I think of myself as open minded and reasonable. I am liberal, and believe in the rights of all people, regardless of race, color, religion or sexual orientation. I believe in being a good person, and doing the right thing wherever possible. I want to accept that others have opinions different from my own. Yet, all of this hate is getting to me. It’s giving me a stomach ache that won’t go away. It’s causing feelings to well up inside me that are full of fear, and frustration. And finally, as each racist, homophobic, xenophobic and misogynistic cabinet appointment is revealed, those feelings inside me are starting to resemble hatred. And that frightens me even more.

Yes, I do hate that we have just set ourselves up to be a white supremacist society that has no filter in how we deal with others. Even our new first lady to be, who has decided to stay in New York, seems to want no part of this sh*t show. Yes, I do hate that you supported this behavior and are doing nothing to stop it, as it spirals out of control before your guy even takes office. Yes, I do hate that suddenly you are smug and spewing rude comments as if it’s ok because our future president does it too. It’s not ok.

I am sorry Michelle. I don’t know how much longer I can continue to go high, when so many around me on both sides are going so very, very low.

Each day, I take a deep breath, and try to remind myself of the good things in life, and to live in the moment, because as the Jews in Nazi Germany can attest to, it can change for the worst in heartbeat. And all indications are that we could easily be headed in that direction.

I believe in free speech, but not in hateful, hurtful speech. Please take a minute to think, before you speak or post a comment that might inspire hateful rhetoric, and demand it from others. If we all did that, it would be the first step in coming together to keep America great.

Photo: Glasshouse Images

Check us out at indigojonesnyc on instagram.

Want to see what we have been pinning? Take a look at our Pinterest page!

Tweet along on Twitter.

To keep up with the latest, show us some “like” by liking our Facebook page

Check out our new site Indigo Jones Eats

Visit our shops on Gourmly ,EcohabitudeChocolate.org and Etsy

The Gift of Thanks

August 17, 2015

Here I am, back on my high horse talking about modern manners. I shared a previous rant about those who don’t respond to invitations, or those who respond and then don’t  show up, leaving the hostess high and dry. Today’s rant is about gratitude.

Last week, I made a select amount of s’mores gift boxes and hand delivered them to a few editors and writers I admired, in honor of National S’mores Day.

 

unnamed2

One lovely recipient posted a photo on her company’s Instagram account with a shout out, and the “likes” flooded in. During the course of the day, there were subsequent posts on the company’s other accounts, and a fave on Twitter. The poster also “liked” some of my photos and started following me on Instagram. This resulted in a spike in views on my website and Etsy shop, as well as a ton of “likes and follows” on my Instagram site. To those not social media savvy, I must sound like a 15 year old, seeking validation from others, one click at a time. Those who do this for a living know that it is the way we grow brand awareness in 2015. I am extremely grateful for the support these people showed me, and they completely outdid themselves with multiple posts that put many thousands of sets of eyeballs on Indigo Jones Eats s’mores. I ‘grammed and tweeted my appreciation back at ’em, sharing the joy with my miniscule amount of followers.

IMG_4243

Its up to 4.837 likes now, on this one shot only!

The other four recipients did not respond at all. Not a peep.

Before we get too carried away, I must say that my intent was not 100% pure.  This was a public relations initiative, and the desired response was social media exposure. A well placed tweet, or a tagged Instagram shot is worth a thousand words of thanks.( See above.) But if for some reason they didn’t want to play; perhaps an overwhelming amount of free items flood thier offices each week and policy prohibits them from issueing a public acceptance. Perhaps they ended up in the office pantry, gobbled up before they could be ‘grammed. Maybe they didn’t like marshmallows. Whatever the reason, its their perogative not to display my wares on their social media sites if they don’t want to. I completly understand and support that decision. I knew going in that I may or may not get a public response. I did it with the intent to grow my brand awareness and expose Indigo Jones Eats to a broader audience.  I do however, feel I deserve some sort of confirmation that they actually got the package. I am not expecting handwritten notes on beautifully letterpressed cards, although I suppose they could be in the mail as we speak. I was expecting that their assistant’s junior intern might shoot me a one line email saying thanks for the treats. As an aside, some of these people have posted dog pictures, old photos of haircuts past, and their latest manicures, so I know they are around, and posting mindless follies.

IMG_4240

Hence, the Miss Manners in me emerging once again. Shouldn’t there be some form of office protocol to respond to what must be, for some, a huge amount of promotional gifts? I certainly would want my brand to be known as gracious, appreciative and at the very least polite to the outside world. I have to say that it skewed my perception of these people ever so slightly.

In the anonymous world of social media, it easy to think that you have a relationship with someone because they share tidbits of their life with you and the general public. We quantify our self worth through “likes” from total strangers, often forgetting to actually acknowledge the real people who reach out to us. So, here is a not so subtle reminder to always remember to say thank you, no matter how small the gesture of kindness might be. (Or the motive behind it.)

In the meantime, if you happen to be reading this, and you know who you are, I have a message for you:

Hey guys! Did you like my s’mores? If so, how bout giving me a “like”? In case I didn’t mention it, its indigojonesnyc. Ok, thanks, bye!

Check us out at indigojonesnyc on instagram.

Want to see what we have been pinning? Take a look at our Pinterest page!

Tweet along on Twitter.

Take a peek at our Tumblr.

To keep up with the latest, show us some “like” by liking our Facebook page

Check out our new site Indigo Jones Eats

Visit our Etsy Shop


%d bloggers like this: