Posts Tagged ‘sesame oil’

Unrecipe of the Week: Asian Cucumber Noodles

July 11, 2016
via the garlic diaries

via the garlic diaries

We love our vegetable noodles around here. In fact, if it weren’t for zucchini noodles, I would be lost. But sometimes, even the novelty of zoodles wears off.

Tonight, I spiralized some fresh cucumber to act as the layer beneath my sauteed shrimp with garlic, sesame oil, soy sauce and ginger.  The cool cucumber “noodles” (cuddles?) were a refreshing change on a very hot summer night. Tossed with a bit of sesame oil, salt, rice wine vinegar and a dash of soy sauce, they brought another flavor profile to my sometimes meager repetoire of foods.

Cold Cucumber “Noodles” With Sesame Oil:

Spiralize a cucumber into long thin ribbons. Salt liberally, and place in a strainer to drain for 20-30 minutes. This allows the cucumber to give off the excess water that might otherwise dilute the subtle sauce.

When ready to serve, toss with a little sesame oil, rice wine vinegar, a pinch of sugar and a dash of soy sauce. Adjust the seasonings, using a little srirachia or hot red pepper flakes to add a little heat if desired. Sprinkle with toasted sesame seeds, and enjoy!

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Unrecipe of the Week: Summer Salad Rolls

May 19, 2014

These vegetable rolls are riff on the traditional Vietnamese Summer roll. A study in simplicity, these rice paper rolls are filled with fresh julienned vegetables. The secret lies in the sauce: we dipped ours in a carrot, sesame oil and soy based dressing that brought the flavors to life. The best part? We’re torn between how healthy and low calorie they are, and the fact that nothing needed to be cooked.  Twice the reason to try this unrecipe!

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For the rolls:

Julienne a variety of vegetables, including cucumbers, carrots, diakon, red bell pepper, radishes and beets. Mix it up to suit your tastes. I used a mandolin, but depending on how many you are making, you can just cut them by hand. Be sure to peel the carrots, diakon and beets first!

To assemble:

Dip a large rice paper wrapper* in warm water to soften. There is no need to soak them, just get them hydrated enough to be pliable.

Place the rice paper on a work surface. Lay a small piece of lettuce and a fresh mint leaf or two at the bottom of disc. Layer on the julienned vegetables. Begin rolling the rice paper, tucking it tightly, but gently as you go. Roll it twice, fold the sides in, and continue rolling to the top. It should look like a fat, transparent egg roll.

Lay the finished roll on plastic wrap. The rolls will stick together, so be sure to keep them from touching. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate until ready to eat.

For the sauce:

Peel about 3-4 medium carrots, and cut them into chunks. Place them in the food processor, along with a small shallot, peeled and quartered, a good sized chunk of peeled fresh ginger, about 1/4 cup of rice wine vinegar, a couple of tablespoons of soy sauce, about a 1/2 or 1 teaspoon of sesame oil. Puree until everything is finely diced and combined. With the machine running, add about 1/4 cup or so of vegetable oil ( We used grape seed oil, which has a neutral flavor. Do not use olive oil, as the flavor is too strong!) Add about 1/4 cup of water, and continue mixing until it forms a a chunky dressing. Check flavors, and add more vinegar, or soy sauce as needed. If the dressing is too thick, add a little bit more water. Refrigerate until ready to use.

We served the rolls cut in half lengthwise, on a pool of drizzled dressing, and then put the rest on a platter with a bowl of sauce on the side. Sounds like the perfect dish to toss in my lunch bag tomorrow!

*rice paper wrappers are sold packaged in the international foods section of grocery stores, or at Asian markets.

Unrecipe of the Week:

September 16, 2012

This week’s challenge was to use everything in my CSA box. The lemongrass posed a bit of a challenge, but I persevered and found an easy way to use it.

It’s Saturday night, which often means shrimp for some crazy reason. Tonight, I marinated them in a soy, honey and sesame oil combination, which also used garlic, ginger and the lemongrass. I served them in radicchio cups with a chopped salad of arugula and radicchio, and a squirt of lime juice.

It was fast, simple and flavorful. The presentation was pretty enough for guests. Sorry to say it got gobbled up faster than Instagram could document it!

Marinated Shrimp in Radicchio Cups:

In a mixing bowl, blend 2 diced garlic cloves, a chunk of peeled and diced ginger, and a couple of tablespoons of chopped lemongrass stems. Add about 1/3 cup of soy sauce, a couple of tablespoons of sesame oil and a tablespoon or so of honey. Whisk the mixture together and add the peeled and deveined shrimp. Allow to marinate about 20-30 minutes in the refrigerator.

In the meantime, prepare the outer leaves of radicchio to form little bowls to hold the shrimp.

Chop up some arugula and radicchio and fill the lettuce cups.

Heat a little vegetable oil in a wok or frying pan. Add the shrimp (without the liquid) and sauté for about 3 minutes until cooked. Add one red pepper, diced, and cook another minute or so.

Spoon the shrimp mixture into the radicchio cups, and squeeze a little lime juice over it.

Enjoy!

Unrecipe of the Week

March 22, 2011

Here is an easy dish that is full of flavor, and has a slightly different twist for those of you who love the Asian Salmon recipe that I posted last year.

Salmon With Soba Noodles

Finely chop 2 garlic cloves, a small chunk of fresh peeled ginger, and a large handful of cilantro. Add the juice of one lime, about ½ cup of low sodium soy sauce, about 2 tablespoons of sesame oil and a little olive oil. Mix it all together in a bowl.

Cook soba noodles according to directions, usually about 3-4 minutes and drain well. Add this to the soy mixture and toss gently.

In the meantime, season salmon filets with salt and pepper and broil until cooked through and slightly crisp on top. (About 8 minutes, depending on broiler heat and size of filets.)

To serve:

Place soba noodles with sauce in a bowl, and put the salmon filet on top.

Sprinkle with sesame seeds and chopped scallions.

Enjoy!!!


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