Posts Tagged ‘sea salt’

Unrecipe of the Week: Avocado Toast

December 26, 2014

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Over the holidays, we have somehow become addicted to avocado toast. Maybe it’s because it’s so easy to make, maybe it is because we think it’s healthy, maybe it is because it is so satisfying and comforting, but most likely it is because it tastes so good! We have been making it on mini slices of toasted baguette as an appetizer, but you can use whatever type of grainy, delicious bread you have and make a meal of it.

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Avocado Toast:

Brush slices of bread with olive oil, and sprinkle it with sea salt. Toast it in the oven until it just starts to brown. Watch is carefully, as bread goes from barely brown to burnt pretty quickly!

In the meantime, mash up a ripe avocado and mix it with the juice of  1/2 of a lemon, sprinkle it with some red pepper flakes and a little sea salt to taste.

Spread the mixture on the toasted bread and devour  enjoy!

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Get creative with it: Rub a garlic clove on the bread before toasting to give it a little more flavor. Sprinkle some diced tomatoes on top for a little extra color. Mix in a few chia seeds for some added health benefits. Serve with a poached egg or some smoked salmon and make a meal out of it!

Photos: Glasshouse Images

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Unrecipe of the Week: Marbled Matzo Brittle

April 14, 2014

Here is a simple, yet delicious version  of the matzo brittle we have posted previously. It has all the properties of the perfect confection. It’s a little bit salty, a little bit crunchy and a little bit sweet. And did I mention it has chocolate? What’s not to love?

 

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Marbled Matzoh Brittle:

Line a large baking sheet with aluminum foil and cover it with parchment paper. If you skip this step, you will be scrubbing for a long, long time. Trust us on this!

Line the pan with sheets of matzo.

In a large saucepan, heat 2 sticks of butter, and 1 cup of brown sugar. Stir constantly with a wooden spoon until it comes to a boil and blends together. If it looks separated, keep stirring. Stir for couple of  minutes or so until it forms caramel. Pour the caramel over the matzo, and smooth it with a spatula.

Bake at 350 degrees for about 10-12 minutes until the caramel is golden in color, and bubbling. Don’t let it burn!

In the meantime, melt 1 1/2 cups of white chocolate chips. Place the melted white chocolate into a pastry bag. (see our tip for doing this here.)

Remove the matzoh from the oven. Sprinkle it with semi-sweet chocolate chips and allow them to soften. Use a spatula to spread the chocolate evenly across the matzoh.

Using the pastry bag  pipe the white chocolate in a zig zag pattern across the matzoh in both directions. Don’t be too worried about precision. Use a skewer, or the tip of a paring knife to smear the white chocolate, forming a marble effect. Alternatively, drizzle the white chocolate onto the matzoh with a spoon, and then use the above technique to marbelize it.

Sprinkle the matzoh lightly with sea salt.

Pop the pan into the refrigerator, and chill until the chocolate is firm.
Using a very sharp knife, slice the chilled matzoh into squares, and enjoy! (Don’t forget to share!)

photo: Spencer Jones for indigo jones eats

Check us out at indigojonesnyc on instagram.

Want to see what we have been pinning? Take a look at our Pinterest page!

Tweet along on Twitter.

Take a peek at our Tumblr.

To keep up with the latest, show us some “like” by liking our Facebook page

Check out our new site Indigo Jones Eats

Salt of the Earth

March 13, 2014

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Salt often gets a bad rap these days, taking the blame for many of our health woes. The fact is, that salt is an essential mineral that our bodies need to properly function. It also adds flavor to food, and can be a natural preservative.

There are many types of salt on the market, each with it’s own distinct flavor and texture. Before you settle for that cardboard cylinder, learn a bit about the different varieties, and how to use each one.

Table salt: Refined from underground mills, this is the most common salt. It is often found in salt shakers, and those cardboard cylinders in the supermarket. Most table salt also contains anticaking agents and iodine, which is an essential  nutrient. The flavor is non distinct and can even be a bit on the bitter side. It is higher in sodium chloride than many other salts, and because of it’s pourable texture and bland taste, it is easily over used.

Kosher salt: The most all- purpose of the bunch, and the one used most frequently by chefs. It’s larger crystals dissolve easily, disperse flavor evenly, and it’s coarse texture works well for sprinkling.

Sea salt: Similar to kosher salt, it has a coarse crystal which dissolves easily, and can also be found finely ground. Sea salt can have a slightly tinged hue, depending on it’s origin, and the minerals it contains. Pink salt, for instance, is iron rich which causes it’s rosy color.
Expect sea salt to have a slightly briny, or even sweet flavor.

Flaked sea salt, or Maldon sea salt: This quick dissolving salt from England is considered a finishing salt.  It’s soft white flakes add a brininess to already cooked foods.

Fleur de Sel: This is the cream of the salt crop. Harvested by hand in France under perfect conditions which allows it to “bloom” on the surface of the water, fleur de sel is slow dissolving, allowing the eater to savor it’s delicate flavor. Crush it in your fingers, and sprinkle it on salads, vegetables and cooked foods.

Himalayan Sea Salt: Hand mined in Pakistan, this ancient salt is thought to be the purest possible. Often used in spa treatments, or as a slab to serve food, it is also useful as both a cooking or a finishing salt.

When using flakier salts, it’s best to add them at the end, and a little can go a long way. Given the coarse or flakier texture, and the increased flavor, you may find you use less than you would when using traditional table salt. Before you just pour the salt on your food, be sure to taste it, and decide if more is really necessary.

photo: Glasshouse Images

Salt of the Earth

September 3, 2012

I was recently in Hilton Head, South Carolina, where several fish restaurants featured a salt scrub in the restrooms, designed to disinfect your hands, as well as soften your skin, and remove any strong fishy smell. The results were spectacular.

It is easy to make your own salt scrub out of natural ingredients for a fraction of the $25 price tag on the restaurant versions.

Exfoliating Salt Scrub:

Place 1 cup of coarse sea salt into a large glass bowl. Slowly stir in about 2 cups of pure coconut oil until the mixture is thick but spreadable. If you wish to add a scented essential oil, you can mix in 5-10 drops at this time.

Pour into a glass mason jar and use as needed on hands and body. Your skin will be exfoliated and soft to the touch.

Enjoy!

photo: Glasshouse Images

Unrecipe of the Week

August 22, 2012

Last night I got home from work totally exhausted and not in the mood for spending much time preparing dinner. I had a few things laying around the kitchen from the night before that I whipped into a great hearty dinner salad.

I love when everything comes together in a way that is worth replicating in the future!

On a bed of baby arugula, I diced leftover chicken breasts, several heirloom tomatoes, and an avocado. I drizzled it with a quick pesto made of a handful of cilantro*, a garlic clove, a little olive oil, the juice of ½ a lime, and some sea salt.

I tossed it with the other ½ of the lime juice and added a crumble of soft goat cheese, and grind of black pepper.

It doesn’t get much easier, or tastier than this!

*I had cilantro on hand, but any hearty green would work just as well: parsley, arugula, basil, spinach, kale…you name it!

Instagram Photos: Indigo Jones


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