Posts Tagged ‘saute’

Unrecipe of the Week: Miso Butter

April 28, 2014

4093602681

Just as there are finishing salts, there are also finishing butters. These items are meant to provide a flavor blast at the end of the preparation, after the food is nearly cooked. This delicious miso butter, is not for sautéing. Try brushing it on seafood, vegetables or even chicken at the end of the cooking process, and watch how it ramps up the simplest of dishes.

I used this on shrimp and scallops, but I also sautéed them with some shallots, garlic and ginger in a little neutral oil before adding the miso butter. Since this is an unrecipe, feel free to toss some of these into the mix to suit your taste.

Miso Butter:

Take 1 stick of unsalted sweet butter and a couple of generous tablespoons of miso paste, and mix it together in the food processor. Add a bit of  soy sauce, and a splash of sake if you have it on hand, and blend until smooth. If you like, toss in a clove of garlic, and a little peeled ginger and blend until minced. Brush the miso butter on fish, seafood, vegetables or chicken during the last minutes of broiling, sautéing, or roasting and enjoy!

This keeps well when placed in a sealed container in the refrigerator for at least a week.

photo: Glasshouse Images

Advertisements

Kitchen Tips Tuesday: Asparagus

January 14, 2014

IMG_1545

We love asparagus! It is flavorful, versatile and good for you.

Asparagus is full of vitamins, and only contains about 3 calories per spear! It’s also a  natural diuretic, which helps reduce bloat.

There are so many delicious ways to prepare asparagus.Drizzle it in a little olive oil and sea salt, and roast it in a hot oven for  about 10-15 minutes until it is cooked, but still crisp. Top it with lemon zest, or a generous sprinkling of parmesan cheese. Saute it, or use it in a stir fry. Toss it in some broth with a little sauteed onion, and some herbs, and puree it into a rich, creamy soup.

Asparagus is best when the tips are tight, and the stalks firm. Many people assume the very skinny stalks are the most tender, but the slightly thicker ones are actually more so. Some like to take a peeler and shave off a bit from the stalks, but it really isn’t necessary.

To store fresh asparagus, place the stalks into a container with an inch or so of water in the refrigerator to allow the stems to continue to stay hydrated.

When you are ready to prepare the asparagus, snap off the tough lower part of the stem. It should naturally break at the point in which it becomes more tender.

Like us on Facebook, follow us on TwitterTumblr, Instagram and Pinterest too!

Peas Please

July 8, 2013

IMG_1729

It’s pea season, and the farmer’s markets are brimming over with shell peas. Pop the pods open and roll out the tiny green peas nestled inside. Each pod only contains a few, so if you are thinking about peas for a crowd, invite someone else to join in the task.

Lots of pods...

Lots of pods…

There are lots of reasons to eat your peas. They are high in protein, vitamin C, fiber and other healthy micronutrients and antioxidants.

Once extracted, the peas can be eaten raw, boiled for 20-30 seconds just to soften them slightly, or quickly sautéed. They are great as a side dish, with just a little butter and salt, or tossed into a salad. Peas are versatile, and can be used in pastas with a creamy or lemony sauce, or pureed into soups, and spreads. Add them to risotto, or grind them into pesto. There isn’t much these little green wonders won’t work with.

Not so many peas...

Not so many peas…

Feel free to share your favorite pea recipes in the comment section!

Like us on Facebook, follow us on TwitterTumblr and Pinterest too

Unrecipe of the Week: Mustard Chicken

March 13, 2013

This is a great weekday dish, that is full of flavor and quick to prepare. While butter and cream can make it extra delicious, a lightened up version using olive oil and half and half tastes pretty yummy too! Pick your degree of richness, and your fresh herb of choice, because hey, that’s why we call it an “unrecipe”.
4093601369

Chicken Breasts With Mustard Sauce

Season boneless, skinless chicken breasts with salt and pepper and saute them in olive oil or butter ( or a combination of the two) on both sides, until browned and cooked through. Remove from the pan and place the chicken in the oven to keep warm.

Add a chopped shallot to the pan and saute until transparent. Scrape the shallots and the brown bits from the bottom of the pan, and sprinkle it with flour.  Stir the flour until blended, and add about 3/4 cup chicken broth, 1/4 cup half and half or cream, and about a 1/2 cup white wine (or champagne if you happen to have some open!) and whisk, allowing the mixture to thicken, but stay smooth and lump free. If it gets too thick, add more wine or broth. Mix in a couple of tablespoons of dijon mustard, and some fresh herbs of your choice. Tarragon, thyme or rosemary are all good options. Put the chicken breasts back into the pan, and allow to simmer for a few minutes to start to absorb the flavors of the sauce.
Place the chicken on a plate, and pour the sauce over it. Garnish it with a sprig of fresh herbs if you are feeling fancy, and enjoy!

photo: Glasshouse Images

Unrecipe of the Week: Risotto with Butternut Squash and Kale

October 5, 2012

During the week, I tend to make the same old things for dinner; salmon, shrimp, and an occasional roasted chicken from Whole Foods.  It’s fast and nutritious, but a bit dull at times.

The CSA box is pushing me outside my comfort zone, and challenging me to use what is at hand to whip up dinner.

Tonight, I used the butternut squash and kale, in a rich risotto with seared scallops on top. It was comfort food at its best. Delicious, but simple enough to allow the flavors of the farm fresh ingredients to shine.

Risotto with Butternut Squash and Kale:

Halve the squash and rub it with a little olive oil. Roast it in a hot oven for about 45 minutes, until it is soft.

Scoop out and discard the seeds, and skin, and cut the squash into small cubes. * I only used ½ of the squash. Wrap the other half up for another use.

In a large pot, sauté one small diced onion in a little olive oil and butter. Add 1 or 2 cups of Arborio rice (depending on portion size) and stir until the rice is about to brown.

Add 1cup or so of chicken or vegetable stock and white wine to the pot, and stir until it is absorbed. Keep doing this for about 20-25 minutes until the rice is tender, and almost porridge-like. It is not necessary to stir it every minute, but be careful that the liquid does not cook out while it is unattended. Stirring also helps get the desired creamy consistency.

Stir in some grated Parmesan cheese and freshly ground black pepper.

While the rice is cooking, wash a couple of handfuls of the kale and cut it into bite-sized pieces. Sauté it in a bit of olive oil with some salt and pepper for a couple of minutes until it starts to wilt. Set aside.

Gently mix the squash and the kale into the rice mixture. Serve in bowls and enjoy!

Seared scallops optional.


%d bloggers like this: