Posts Tagged ‘salmon’

Sun Protection From The Inside Out

August 3, 2015

We all know the importance of slathering on the sunscreen before going out for prolonged periods of time, but even short strolls in the blazing sun can do damage to our skin.

An article featured on Q blog this week points out the ways we can protect our skin from the inside out, by eating the right foods to help reduce the damage from UV rays.

Green Tea: 

The antioxidents in green tea have been proven to reduce the risks of cancer. According to Dr.Macrene Alexiades-Armenakas, these powerful leaves “offer photo-protection from the sun’s radiation, blocking UV lights that cause skin tumors.” It is also associated with increased fat burning, so drink up!

Tomatoes:

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These ruby red fruits are at their peak right now. The lypocene found in tomatoes not only increases collagen production thereby boosting elasticity, it also helps neutralize the harmful effects of sunlight.

Salmon:

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Salmon contains high levels of vitamin D, which increases natural sun tolerance and is blocked by the use of topical sunscreens. Raw salmon (ala sushi and sashimi,) has even more vitamin D than its cooked counterpart.

Dark Chocolate: 

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The flavinoids in dark chocolate improve blood flow by dilating the vessels, which provides protection when you skin burns.

While adding these protective foods to your diet is great, it does not replace the need for using a good sunscreen and a floppy hat when you are out in the sun.

Photos: Green Tea: Found Health

All others: Glasshouse Images

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What’s Brewing? Dinner!

November 21, 2013

Detail of automatic coffee maker and cord.

Lately, I have been seeing all kinds of alternative cooking methods, ranging from poaching salmon in the dishwasher, to actually cooking the Thanksgiving turkey in it. One article suggested using it to wash large quantities of potatoes.

Of course we have all seen the trick of using an iron to make grilled cheese sandwiches, and isn’t a waffle iron just another texture of a Panini press or a George Forman grill anyways?
Today’s trick, discovered courtesy of NPR’s The Salt, shows you how to create an entire meal in a drip coffee maker!

While it seems a bit outrageous, we think it’s a stroke of genius!
Inspired by her nephew’s stint in Afghanistan, where the food was not up to par, and the only appliance the soldiers were allowed to have were coffee makers, Jody Anderson cooked up some recipes that he could whip up right in his quarters.

It turns out the coffee pot is very versatile, offering different cooking methods that can be used in tandem to create entire meals in 20 minutes.

The top basket functions as a steamer. Toss in a mix of cut vegetables that have similar cooking times. The vegetables can steam while the rest of the meal cooks elsewhere.

The vessel is the perfect place to poach meat or fish, boil eggs or grains, and cook oatmeal or soup.

The burner, albeit small, can be used to grill sandwiches, or fry an egg.

The NPR team attempted to cook a coffee pot meal, with astounding results.

They used the pot to cook up some cous cous, and then used it to poach a salmon filet.

While the food was cooking below, they steamed broccoli in the upper basket.

The finished product looked pretty appetizing, and the clean up was a breeze.
For how –tos, visit The Salt.

photo: Glasshouse Images

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Here Comes the Sun

July 17, 2013

It’s hot here in New York City, and the blazing sun beating down on us during our walk to work isn’t doing us any favors.  Slathering on the sun block ( and deodorant!) and donning a hat are good habits, but a recent article from the Greatist suggests that what you eat can provide some serious protection from the sun’s harmful rays.

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Salmon and other foods rich in omega- 3 fatty acids, can protect the skin from free radical damage, and have been shown to prevent some types of skin cancers.

Cacao Beans with Chocolate Pieces

Dark chocolate contains flavonoids, which help guard against UV rays. They also keep the skin hydrated and boost blood flow. While chocolate and bikinis seem a bit counterintuitive, a little of this delicious treat could help prevent sunburn.

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Leafy greens and herbs are packed with antioxidants that protect the skin. Studies have shown that eating dark leafy greens can stave off the reappearance of skin cancer.

Multicolored tomatoes

Red and yellow vegetables, such as bell peppers, tomatoes and carrots, are skin protecting super foods. Lycopene and carotenoids are the compounds to thank for reduced reactions to sunburn, and other skin irritations.

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Cruciferous vegetables are also packed with the ability to fight free radicals. Eat your broccoli, cauliflower or Brussels spouts to ward off cancer.

tea, mornings, breakfast

Top your healthy meal off with a cup of tea. Both green and black tea are strong cancer fighters and one study claims that just one cup of tea per day can lower the incidence of melanoma.

Why not include these foods in your diet on a regular basis? In addition to their skin protecting powers, they all play roles in a healthy, balanced diet.

photos: Glasshouse Images

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Power Couples

July 26, 2012

In any great coupling, each partner brings out the best in the other.
This is also true with food. Here a few foods that not only taste delicious, but enhance one another’s health benefits when eaten together:

Steak and rosemary:

The rosmarinic and carnosic acids in rosemary stop the cancer causing heterocyclic amines from forming on grilled meat.

Chop a few sprigs of rosemary and mix with olive oil, salt, ground black pepper, crushed garlic and balsamic vinegar to create a tasty marinade for steak and protect your body from the effects of grilling.

Salmon and Broccoli:

Many fish, such as salmon, are rich in selenium, which protects the thyroid and helps fight cancer.
Broccoli contains sulphoraphane, which makes the cancer fighting power 13 times stronger than if the fish were eaten alone. Mixing a spicy condiment, such as wasabi, can double the cancer fighting properties in the broccoli.

One of our favorite ways to enjoy salmon is to serve it with broccoli and soba noodles, in a brothy sauce made of garlic, ginger, soy sauce, sesame oil and a little sriracha hot sauce. A delicious meal, that wards off cancer!

Red Wine and Almonds:

The resveratrol in red wine and the high vitamin E levels in almonds thin the blood and help improve the flow of the blood vessels.

‘Nuf said.

Tea with Lemon:

The vitamin C in lemon enhances the absorption of catechins, the disease-fighting antioxidant in tea, which also burns fat.  Adding the lemon can enhance the absorption of the catechins by 300%! Try green tea for an extra wallop!

Spinach and Mushrooms:

Mushrooms are a great source of vitamin D, which helps the calcium in the spinach seep into your body to fortify the bones.

Sauté a diced shallot in a little olive oil and add the mushrooms. Cook until browned and the liquid they give off is absorbed. Add the spinach and season with salt and pepper. Mix until the spinach wilts. Add a squirt of lemon juice before serving and enjoy the flavor while strengthening your skeleton!

Add some of these simple to prepare power couples into your diet and reap the benefits of their relationship!

photos: Glasshouse Images

Unrecipe of the Week: Waste Case Edition

April 1, 2012

In the spirit of avoiding food waste, I saved last night’s sauteed kale with shallots and converted it into a pesto topping for salmon.

It was a small amount; exactly the amount I would have tossed out a week ago, since it wasn’t really enough for another meal. Being conscious of food waste, I became creative with my leftovers and found a way to enhance our meal with something that was already there.

It’s easy to take almost any strong flavored green vegetable and make it into pesto. I have used broccoli rabe and spinach in the past, as an alternative to the traditional basil.

Tonight, I put 1/2 a garlic clove ( remember it was a tiny amount of kale) and a tiny handful of pistachio nuts into the food processor, with some parmesan cheese and the kale. I added a little drizzle of olive oil to thin it down, until it became a thick paste.

After broiling the salmon for a few minutes, I spread the pesto mixture over it, and cooked it for a couple more minutes.

It was flavorful and added a nice and healthy touch to a menu staple that we eat several times per week.

What do you have on hand that you can use to make a mundane meal more interesting?

Here is recipe for a more traditional take on pesto. Use it as a guide to make your own innovative variations, based on what you have on hand.

Traditional Pesto:

1 bunch of basil leaves (about 2 cups)

2 garlic cloves

1/3 cup pignoli nuts* ( or walnuts)

1/2 cup grated parmesan cheese

1/3 cup olive oil (or more if needed)

salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

Put the basil, garlic and nuts into the food processor,and process until finely chopped.

With the motor running, drizzle the olive oil into the bowl until the mixture forms a thick paste. Stir in the parmesan cheese. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

If serving over pasta, heat sauce in a pan until warm . If necessary, add a little of the pasta cooking water to thin it down. If you like a creamier texture, add a little heavy cream tot the sauce. Toss with the hot pasta and enjoy!

photo: Glasshouse Images

Unrecipe of the Week

March 22, 2011

Here is an easy dish that is full of flavor, and has a slightly different twist for those of you who love the Asian Salmon recipe that I posted last year.

Salmon With Soba Noodles

Finely chop 2 garlic cloves, a small chunk of fresh peeled ginger, and a large handful of cilantro. Add the juice of one lime, about ½ cup of low sodium soy sauce, about 2 tablespoons of sesame oil and a little olive oil. Mix it all together in a bowl.

Cook soba noodles according to directions, usually about 3-4 minutes and drain well. Add this to the soy mixture and toss gently.

In the meantime, season salmon filets with salt and pepper and broil until cooked through and slightly crisp on top. (About 8 minutes, depending on broiler heat and size of filets.)

To serve:

Place soba noodles with sauce in a bowl, and put the salmon filet on top.

Sprinkle with sesame seeds and chopped scallions.

Enjoy!!!

Unrecipe of the Week

August 11, 2009

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Looking for a way to jazz up fish? Try this “unrecipe” for a quick mustard, and fresh herb topping for broiled salmon:

Salmon with Mustard and Fresh Herb Sauce:

Dijon mustard (about 2 tablespoons)

Chopped fresh thyme and rosemary

A clove or 2 of minced garlic

A drizzle of olive oil

A dollop of white wine

Mix the ingredients well.
Sprinkle fish filets with salt and pepper, and broil until the top is just starting to brown (about 2 or 3 minutes).

Spread the mustard mixture over the fish, and return to the broiler until the fish is cooked through.

Enjoy!

photo: Glasshouse Images


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