Posts Tagged ‘roast’

Unrecipe of the Week: Miso Butter

April 28, 2014

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Just as there are finishing salts, there are also finishing butters. These items are meant to provide a flavor blast at the end of the preparation, after the food is nearly cooked. This delicious miso butter, is not for sautéing. Try brushing it on seafood, vegetables or even chicken at the end of the cooking process, and watch how it ramps up the simplest of dishes.

I used this on shrimp and scallops, but I also sautéed them with some shallots, garlic and ginger in a little neutral oil before adding the miso butter. Since this is an unrecipe, feel free to toss some of these into the mix to suit your taste.

Miso Butter:

Take 1 stick of unsalted sweet butter and a couple of generous tablespoons of miso paste, and mix it together in the food processor. Add a bit of  soy sauce, and a splash of sake if you have it on hand, and blend until smooth. If you like, toss in a clove of garlic, and a little peeled ginger and blend until minced. Brush the miso butter on fish, seafood, vegetables or chicken during the last minutes of broiling, sautéing, or roasting and enjoy!

This keeps well when placed in a sealed container in the refrigerator for at least a week.

photo: Glasshouse Images

Kitchen Tips Tuesday: Asparagus

January 14, 2014

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We love asparagus! It is flavorful, versatile and good for you.

Asparagus is full of vitamins, and only contains about 3 calories per spear! It’s also a  natural diuretic, which helps reduce bloat.

There are so many delicious ways to prepare asparagus.Drizzle it in a little olive oil and sea salt, and roast it in a hot oven for  about 10-15 minutes until it is cooked, but still crisp. Top it with lemon zest, or a generous sprinkling of parmesan cheese. Saute it, or use it in a stir fry. Toss it in some broth with a little sauteed onion, and some herbs, and puree it into a rich, creamy soup.

Asparagus is best when the tips are tight, and the stalks firm. Many people assume the very skinny stalks are the most tender, but the slightly thicker ones are actually more so. Some like to take a peeler and shave off a bit from the stalks, but it really isn’t necessary.

To store fresh asparagus, place the stalks into a container with an inch or so of water in the refrigerator to allow the stems to continue to stay hydrated.

When you are ready to prepare the asparagus, snap off the tough lower part of the stem. It should naturally break at the point in which it becomes more tender.

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Unrecipe of the Week: Accordion Potatoes

July 29, 2013

For awhile, it seemed like we were bombarded with photos of beautiful accordion-like potatoes, often referred to as Hasselback Potatoes, in honor of the Swedish restaurant The Hasselbacken, which created them. Tonight, I thought I would give them a try, as the accompaniment to a rack of lamb.

I used small Yukon Gold potatoes, but any kind will do.

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Peel the potatoes. (confession: I didn’t.) Cut small slits into the potato, leaving it still attached at the bottom. You can place chopsticks on the cutting board on both sides of the potato to stop the blade of the knife from going all the way through. Be sure to cut deeply enough, or the potato will not fan open while baking.

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Brush the potato liberally with melted butter or olive oil, allowing it to seep between the cut. Sprinkle it with coarse salt and any other seasonings you wish to use. Place the potatoes in a greased  pan, cover with foil and bake in a hot, 400 degree oven for about 30  minutes, depending on the size of the potatoes. Uncover, and brush with more butter or oil, and cook another 15-20 minutes until they are golden brown. Enjoy!

Some recipes call for cheese, garlic, or any other topping that catches your fancy. If you are using cheese, add it to the last 15 minutes of roasting.

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