Posts Tagged ‘research’

Like White on Rice

March 27, 2015

 

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A scientist from Sri Lanka has discovered a way to drastically reduce the calories in white rice, through a cooking technique.

Dr. Pushparajah Thavarajah and his student Sudhair James claim that adding coconut oil to the cooking water can alter the digestable starchy components of rice, resulting in a significant reduction in calories.

Apparently, the oil reacts with the starch in the rice, changing its structure. Chilling the rice helps foster the conversion of the starches, which remains even when the rice is reheated.

We don’t know if the technique really works or not, but it certainly is worth a try.

The experts suggest adding 3% of the weight of the rice in coconut oil to the boiling water before adding the rice. Once the rice is cooked, it can be chilled to further the process of converting the starches.
Rice made in advance can be reheated, without affecting the results.

Future studies with bread are underway.

photo: Glasshouse Images

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Join Us!

February 25, 2015

Tonight, we are hosting a very special event on behalf of Cycle for Survival. Please join us to enjoy great performances, wonderful food and drinks, win amazing raffle prizes and more importantly, help us raise money for research and clinical trials to fight rare forms of cancer. Every dollar raised will be matched, and all funds go directly into global lifesaving research at Memorial Sloane Kettering Hospital. All of us have been touched by cancer in some way, and we all know how devastating this disease can be. Help us imagine a world where it can be cured, or even eradicated.

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If you can’t make it tonight, but would like to join the battle against rare cancers, please go the website:

http://mskcc.convio.net/site/TR/CycleforSurvival/AG_Cycle_Event?px=1218161&pg=personal&fr_id=2340

Obesity and Cancer

January 14, 2015

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Look out tobacco, there is a new risk in town. Yes, something else is running so rampant in our society, that it is about to replace tobacco use as the leading cause of cancer.

According to the American Society of Clinical Oncology, obesity is poised to overtake tobacco as the number one modifiable factor in cancer risk.

While most everyone is aware of the link between smoking and lung cancer, very few know about the connection between cancer and being over wieght.

Tobacco use has dropped over the years, largely due to the restrictions on it’s use throughout the United States, and many other countries. The obesity rate, however continues to grow. According to Dr. Clifford Hudis, a physician at Memorial Sloane Kettering and a former president of the ASCO, current projections state that 60% of all  residents of southern states will be obese by 2030.

While more research needs to be done, cancer risk is just another reason to maintain a healthy weight. Adjusting one’s diet is a key factor in overall good health and may contribute to warding off cancer, in addition to hypertension, diabetes and arthritis.

To help support life saving research and clinical trials, please consider contributing to our Cycle for Survival team. Every dollar raised goes to help fund this valuable work. This week, every donation will be matched, doubling your impact.

http://mskcc.convio.net/site/TR/CycleforSurvival/AG_Cycle_Event?px=1218161&pg=personal&fr_id=2340

photo: Glasshouse Images

Check us out at indigojonesnyc on instagram.

Want to see what we have been pinning? Take a look at our Pinterest page!

Tweet along on Twitter.

Take a peek at our Tumblr.

To keep up with the latest, show us some “like” by liking our Facebook page

Check out our new site Indigo Jones Eats

Exercise Your Way Young?

April 17, 2014

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We all know that exercise benefits our health in many ways, but a new study shows it might also help us look younger too.

Researchers at McMaster University in Canada found that mice became ill when sedentary, but thrived when given access to a running wheel. The theory was then applied to humans, with positive results.

A group of  men and women ages 20-84 were split into 2 groups; the first exercising vigorously for 3 hours per week, and the other less than 1 hour per week. It was discovered that after age 40, those who got more exercise also had thinner and healthier status cornuems and thicker dermis layers, a skin composition more similar to those aged 20-30.

They also studied a sedentary group of people over the age of 65. After three months on an exercise programs, the participant’s skin was found to be similar in make up to that of 20-40 year olds, and they looked visibly younger.

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Instead of investing in costly lotions and potions to battle the visible signs of aging, perhaps it’s time to start working out. You heart, lungs, bones and skin will thank you.

photos: Glasshouse Images

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Shine Bright

March 2, 2013

Last night, Saturday  Night Live’s Seth Meyers lit the Empire State Building up in orange, in honor of  Cycle for Survival.

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The event has raised almost $31 million dollars for rare cancer research since it’s inception in 2007. The charity has funded 53 clinical trials through Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. One hundred percent of all money donated is funneled into life saving research within 9 months.

Cycle for Survival’s founder, Jennifer Goodman-Linn, and her husband Dave, created the event as a way for Jen to give something back to the community that supported her on her 7 year battle with a rare form of sarcoma. An avid cyclist and marketing executive, Jen found a way to merge her passions to help others. She touched the lives of many, both personally, and through her blog, YOU FEARLESS, which documented her life with the disease. Her optimism shone as brightly as the building which is lit in her honor. Sadly, she lost her fight in 2010.

Tomorrow, my team will be joined by 13,000 others as we ride to help keep Jen’s legacy and indomitable spirit alive, by supporting this amazing organization.

Won’t you help us find a cure for cancer? Please donate by clicking the link below:
http://mskcc.convio.net/site/TR/CycleforSurvival/AG_Cycle_Event?team_id=21582&pg=team&fr_id=1818

“Nobody beats cancer until we all beat cancer.”

Organic Panic?

September 5, 2012

Health researchers at Stanford University released a study this week casting doubt on the advantages of organic meats and produce. While they concluded that most fruits and vegetables labeled organic were not more nutritious than the conventional versions, the jury is still out on whether or not spending extra for organic products is worth it.

Conventional varieties tested did have more pesticide residue on them, but the levels fall within the allowable limits set by the Environmental Protection Agency. The question lies in whether or not these levels are in fact safe for humans long term.

Many of the key motivators for buying organic foods are the stringent rules governing the farming of these items.

Organic chicken and pork were found to less likely to be contaminated by antibiotic resistant bacteria.

The study also found that organic milk contained higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids, which are beneficial to the heart. Organic produce also had higher levels of phosphorous, and phenols, believed to help prevent cancer.

Organic foods also have less environmental impact than large-scale conventional farming techniques.

More specific studies have found some added benefits to going organic.  A Washington State University study done in 2010 found organic strawberries contained higher levels of vitamin C than their conventionally counterparts.

Three other studies published last year, from Columbia University, The University of California Berkley and Mount Sinai Hospital, showed that children whose mothers ate organically during pregnancy had a higher I.Q. than those whose mother was exposed to higher levels of pesticides.

While this news is likely to spark controversy among farmers and nutrition experts alike, the facts are still somewhat inconclusive.

For children, pregnant women and those with impaired immune systems, the benefits may still out weigh the expense of purchasing organically grown food.

The choice, as always, belongs to the consumer.

photos:Glasshouse Images

Exercise: Getting to the Heart of the Matter

June 1, 2012

The New York Times ran a story today about the potential negative effects of exercise on a small part of the population.
In analyzing the data from six different rigorous exercise studies involving 1,687 people, about 10% got worse in at least 1 or more measures related to heart disease. These included insulin levels, blood pressure, HDL cholesterol and triglycerides.

About 7% of those tested showed a decline in 2 or more factors.

The results were not related to age, race or gender. They also were not affected by how fit the people were at the start of the program, or how much their fitness levels improved. There appears to be no correlation between the decline in health measurements and any other factor.

There is great concern that this gives inactive people an excuse not get moving.

While the article is interesting, yet inconclusive, the 300 comments are more fascinating.

Many are questioning the other factors not followed in the study: diet, sodium intake and what type of exercise was done. There is no reference to these individual’s genetics. There is also concern that the subjects were not followed long enough to know what, if any effect this had on mortality rates.

Most agree on one thing: the benefits seem to out weigh the risks. There are many more pieces of research supporting the positive outcome of exercise, than this small study. Perhaps fitness is another place where “one size” does not fit all.

Stay tuned for more on this controversial topic.


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