Posts Tagged ‘nectarines’

Unrecipe of the Week: Arugula and Stone Fruit Salad

September 15, 2014

Battling lunchtime boredom is a real issue with me. I want to eat something that is fresh, healthy, low in calories and low in refined carbs. It needs to be easily transportable, and cant’t take too much prep time in the morning. That often leaves me tied to my desk with a lackluster salad, or a bowl of Greek yogurt. Until now.

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See how it went so beautifully with the pile of books on my desk?

This salad combination awakened all of my senses: It’s rich autumnal colors made it beautiful to behold. The flavors are a unique combination of sweet, salty, and slightly bitter. The textures range from crisp to soft and succulently juicy. It was ready in minutes and fit perfectly into a compact mason jar, dressing and all! In a word, perfection.

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Arugula and Stone Fruit Salad:

In the bottom of a mason jar, drizzle a little bit of olive oil and aged balsamic vinegar. The balsamic vinegar that has been aged 10 years or more has an almost syrup-like consistency, and tends to be much sweeter than regular balsamic. If you don’t have it, no worries, just use the regular kind, and adjust the quantity accordingly. ( You will want a bit more.) Next add a few big handfuls of baby arugula, and pack it in tightly. Core and chop the stone fruit of your choice ( I have been using nectarines and plums) and put it on top of the arugula. Lastly, add some diced ricotta salata cheese and seal the jar. You can substitute feta, goat or even mozzarella cheese if you prefer. For a little more crunch, add a sprinkling of chopped nuts.

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When you are ready to eat the salad, shake the jar to mix the dressing in, pour it into a bowl and enjoy!

photos: indigojonesnyc instagram

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The Clean 15

June 5, 2012

We have written here about the “Dirty Dozen,” a list of produce that has the highest levels of pesticides and contamination. It is recommended that these foods be organic wherever possible.

There is another list called the “Clean 15”, which have the lowest pesticide load, and can be enjoyed in the conventional varieties.

These are:

Onions

Sweet corn

Pineapples

Avocado

Sweet peas

Mangoes

Eggplant

Cantaloupe

Kiwi

Watermelon

Sweet potatoes

Grapefruit

Mushrooms

Asparagus

Other foods, such as broccoli, cabbage and tomatoes have more recently tested cleaner as well, due to less pest threats, and therefore less spraying.

Many of these fruits and vegetables have a protective outer layer that gets peeled or removed before eating. This helps eliminate the toxins, which are largely on the outside of the food.

The current list of the most harmful foods tested positive for at least 47 different chemicals, and as many as 67. Buying organic insures that the fruit and vegetables are not treated with harmful pesticides.

Foods that should be organic:

Celery

Strawberries

Peaches

Apples

Blueberries

Nectarines

Sweet bell peppers

Spinach, kale and collard greens

Cherries

Potatoes

Grapes

Lettuce

This lists were compiled by the Environmental Working Group, which is an organization made up of scientists, researchers and policymakers. The data used was supplied by the United States Department of Agriculture’s tests for pesticide residue on fresh produce.

photos: Glasshouse Images

 

Unrecipe of the Week

October 2, 2009

Roasted Fruit

As the weather starts to turn, we start to crave warmer, heartier versions of our favorite foods. We love this simple roasted fruit dish. It’s easy, healthy, and versatile. Serve it with pound cake and vanilla ice cream, as a filling for crepes, or add a dollop to your morning oatmeal!

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Slice a variety of stone fruits, such as peaches, plums or nectarines and toss them into a glass or ceramic baking dish.

Sprinkle them with a little sugar.

Add some berries, such as blueberries and raspberries.

Toss in a cinnamon stick or two.

Bake in the oven at 400 for about 25-30 minutes, until the fruit is softened, the berries have given off juice, and it is starting to thicken.

Stir in a splash of orange juice.

Enjoy!

This can be served hot or at room temperature. If you want to make it ahead and serve it hot, take it out a little sooner, and wait to add the orange juice until you are ready to serve it.

Photo: Glasshouse Images


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