Posts Tagged ‘miso paste’

Unrecipe of the Week: Miso Butter

April 28, 2014

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Just as there are finishing salts, there are also finishing butters. These items are meant to provide a flavor blast at the end of the preparation, after the food is nearly cooked. This delicious miso butter, is not for sautéing. Try brushing it on seafood, vegetables or even chicken at the end of the cooking process, and watch how it ramps up the simplest of dishes.

I used this on shrimp and scallops, but I also sautéed them with some shallots, garlic and ginger in a little neutral oil before adding the miso butter. Since this is an unrecipe, feel free to toss some of these into the mix to suit your taste.

Miso Butter:

Take 1 stick of unsalted sweet butter and a couple of generous tablespoons of miso paste, and mix it together in the food processor. Add a bit of  soy sauce, and a splash of sake if you have it on hand, and blend until smooth. If you like, toss in a clove of garlic, and a little peeled ginger and blend until minced. Brush the miso butter on fish, seafood, vegetables or chicken during the last minutes of broiling, sautéing, or roasting and enjoy!

This keeps well when placed in a sealed container in the refrigerator for at least a week.

photo: Glasshouse Images

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Unrecipe of the Week: Miso Coconut Chicken

March 10, 2014

I was craving something with some interesting flavors, but nothing too spicy, too heavy or too obvious. I stumbled upon this recipe adapted from i am a food blog, and knew this was just what I was looking for. The smell of onion, ginger, mushrooms and garlic, perfumed the kitchen and added just the right amount of flavors to chicken. The miso paste and coconut milk combined to make the perfect sauce; creamy, but not cloying, and so delicious we wanted to eat it with a spoon. Of course, I tweaked it, or maybe just didn’t bother to measure it, to make it into an real unrecipe.

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Miso Coconut Chicken:

Season chicken pieces with salt and pepper and sear, skin side down, in vegetable oil for 6-8 minutes until it is crispy and brown.

Remove chicken from the pan, and sauté about 1/2 of a large onion diced, 2 or 3 cloves of diced garlic, and a nice sized hunk of diced ginger until it is soft and fragrant, but not too browned. Add in about a pound of sliced shitake mushrooms, and continue to cook until the mushrooms are done, scraping up any browned bits as you go.

Add 2 tablespoons of water, and 2 heaping tablespoon of miso paste to the pan, stirring until it becomes smooth. Add 1 can (14-16 oz. ) of unsweetened coconut milk to the pan and stir to combine. Bring to a simmer, and add the chicken pieces back to the pan. Cover, and simmer for 30-40 minutes until the chicken is fully cooked. Taste the sauce and correct the seasonings if necessary. Serve over steamed jasmine rice, and enjoy!

photo: glasshouse images

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Super Foods to the Rescue

March 11, 2012

We are constantly bombarded with the latest “super food” that we should add to our diets. Some of us are more influenced by the hype than others. A certain male in my family jumped on the soy shake bandwagon a few years ago, only to find out that it’s benefits centered mostly on relieving menopause symptoms!

These latest additions to the super food list come from afar, and are packed with medicinal properties to protect, enhance and boost your health.

Seaweed:

The Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry has concluded that seaweed can be just as effective at lowering blood pressure as some medications. It’s also a great source of iodine, which helps control the thyroid, thus preventing weight gain. It contains natural magnesium, which can improve sleep quality.

Seaweed is a staple in the Japanese diet, and is used in making sushi, as well as tasty salads. Trader Joe’s has a great dried seaweed snack that is only 30 calories per serving and costs a mere $.99 per bag. Try the sea salt or wasabi versions as an alternative to highly caloric chips for a quick snack.

Miso:

This Japanese soy paste is popular when made into a soup, or used as a condiment to make sauces. It has also been linked to a low incidence of prostate cancer in Japanese men. A recent study has shown that women who ate 3 or more bowls of miso soup per day had a 40% less risk of breast cancer than women who at just one.

 

Super Easy Super Food Miso Soup:

Bring 4 cups of water to a boil. Stir a little bit into 2-4 tablespoons of miso paste and add it to the boiling water. As miso pastes differ, taste and add a bit more until you find the flavor that is best for you.

Add sliced green onions, soba noodles, cilantro, watercress, cubed firm tofu and maybe even a little seaweed if desired and enjoy!

photo: Glasshouse Images

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