Posts Tagged ‘milk’

Unrecipe of the Week: Coconut Ice Cream

June 10, 2015

 

This sweet treat is rich and creamy, with the flavor of coconut. It has very few ingredients, and pairs well with all kinds of fruit. Unlike many icecreams, this does not use eggs and doesn’t require any cooking. It doesn’t get much easier than that!

We served our coconut ice cream with strawberries and mini biscuits for a riff on the traditional strawberry shortcake. It was such a hit that we are sure this one will be in heavy rotation all summer long!

This unrecipe calls for cream of coconut. Don’t mistake this for canned coconut milk. Cream of coconut is thick and syrupy, and very sweet. It is found in the international foods area of most supermarkets, and is what gives this it’s flavor and sweetness.

Coconut Ice Cream:

Mix together 1 cup of milk, 1 1/2 cups of heavy cream and a 15 oz. can of cream of coconut.  Mix well in a blender or food processor until it is combined and smooth in texture. Pour into your icecream maker and freeze according to manufacturer’s instructions. Tranfer the icecream into a container and freeze until ready to eat.

You can add fresh shredded coconut, or mini chocolate chips or diced pineapple to customize the recipe at the end of the freezing / churning process.

We use a special attachement for our Kitchen Aid stand mixer, which must be frozen in advance, so be sure you have placed it in the freezer the day before, if you are using that type.

If you don’t have an icecream maker, or suitable attachment,go ahead and give this a try. Make sure it is mixed really well. Place the mixure into a pan (we think a loaf pan is the perfect size) and freeze for about 30-45 minutes until the edges are starting to freeze. Remove it from the freezer and stir it vigorously to break up any ice crystals. Return it to the freezer and repeat this every 30 minutes or so until the ice cream is fully frozen and creamy, and enjoy!

Photo:  Glasshouse Images

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Kitchen Tips Tuesday: Buttermilk

March 10, 2015

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What do you do if a recipe calls for buttermilk, and you don’t have any?
Do you frantically dash to the store and get some? Calm down. There is no need to make the trek to the store if you have the ingredients to make your own.

Buttermilk adds an acidity to batters and reacts with the baking soda or powder to create airy, fluffy and tender baked goods.

To make a good substitute, add a tablespoon of plain white vinegar or lemon juice to a scant cup of milk and let it sitat room temperature

for 5 to 10 minutes. The lemon or vinegar will begin to curdle the milk, and it will thicken slightly. If you use a heavier dairy product, like half and half or cream, the end result will be thicker than if you use regular milk.

Another option is to thin out plain yogurt or sour cream with one part water to three parts dairy. For instance, 3/4 cup of yogurt, thinned with one quarter cup of water. Stir until it reaches a more liquid consistency, and use in place of buttermilk in recipes.

photo: Glasshouse Images

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The Skinny On Full Fat Dairy

March 26, 2014

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I only eat fat free dairy products.  I use skim milk in my coffee, and eat 0% Greek yogurt for breakfast. I do this mainly because I always do. I have been conditioned to think that fat is bad for you, and the reduction in calories from fat free products is a good thing. Also, I am perfectly satisfied with the taste and consistency, so I don’t even think to try a richer, higher fat version.

Until now. A recent study at Washington State University analyzed 400 samples of organic and conventional milk over an 18 month period and found that the organic milk contained significantly more heart healthy omega-3s than it’s conventional counterpart. It also found that whole milk had an even higher amount of omega-3s than reduced fat versions. Hmmm.

The vitamins in milk, especially vitamins A and D are fat soluble, which means they require fat to be absorbed into the body. Omega 3s are a fatty acid, so it should come as no surprise that more of them would appear in full fat milk. According to the study, the whole milk contained 50% more omega-3s than 2% milk, and 66% more than 1% milk.

The other interesting fact is the levels of omega-6 fatty acids in conventional milk were extremely high, due to the corn and grain intensive diet fed to conventional cows, vs. the mostly grass fed diet of organic cows.

Omega-6 acids promote cell rigidity and help our blood to clot by triggering an inflammatory reaction in our bodies. They are also involved in fat storage.  Omega-3 acids help calm inflammation, promote cell permeability, and metabolize glucose. While we need to have both of these in our diets, the ratio of omega -3 to omega-6 should be about 1 to 1. Due to the amount of corn and soybean oils found in many commercial products consumed in the United States, the amount of inflammatory omega-6s are much higher.

While the Department of Agriculture and other food and nutrition experts have yet to change their tune on fat in dairy products, researchers hope that this information will trigger new ways of thinking about fats in general.

photo:Glasshouse Images

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Unrecipe of the Week: Chicken Roasted in Milk

January 6, 2014

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On New Year’s Day, I craved something warm, nourishing and different. I stumbled upon the recipe for Jamie Oliver’s Chicken in Milk, and thought it sounded downright vile. The idea of combining chicken, milk, lemon,garlic and cinnamon seemed just wrong. Yet, a writer from a trusted source, The Kitchn, absolutely raved about it, claiming it was the best chicken she has ever eaten. So,in the spirit of “new year, new attitude”, YOLO, etc., I decided to cook on the wild side and give it a try. We are all very glad that I did. It was crispy on the outside, succulent on the inside, and the sauce was surprisingly clean, yet rich at the same time. The flavors somehow meshed together perfectly, and the only regret was not having a loaf of thick bread on hand to sop up the sauce the chicken was sitting in. Go ahead, step outside of the norm, and give it a try. It really is delicious!

Jamie Oliver’s Chicken Roasted in Milk: (unrecipe version, of course!)

(c) 2012 || jocelynmathewesphotography.com

Season one whole chicken ( about 3 or 3.5 pounds or so ) with salt and pepper, and brown it in olive oil in a large, but snug fitting pot that is oven proof. Remove the chicken, pour out the excess fat, and place the chicken back in the pot.

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Toss in a handful of fresh sage leaves, 1/2 a cinnamon stick ( confesssion: I used ground cinnamon since I was out of sticks and it was just fine) 8 or 10 garlic cloves unpeeled, and the zest of 2 lemons. Pour in about 2 1/2 cups of milk, and roast in a 375 degree oven for about 90 minutes until the skin is crisp and the meat is cooked through. You can walk away and forget about it like I did, or baste it from time to time. Our sauce did not curdle at all, but you may expect to get a few curds.

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When you are ready to serve it, pull the chicken off the bones with your gloved hands,( it’s hot!) or use a poultry sheers to cut it into pieces. Pour the juices over the chicken, and prepare to be wowed! You can squeeze the roasted garlic cloves onto bread,  vegetables, or mix into mashed potatoes and enjoy!

photos: Glasshouse Images

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Kitchen Tips Tuesday: Burn Treatments

June 11, 2013

As a continuation of my series of “Unfortunate Events”, I spent a few days last week in the Cornell Burn Unit at New York Hospital.  I know what you are thinking: Yes, I did just finish physical therapy on a fractured knee. Mmmhmm, I did hurt my foot after a triumphant return to the gym and taking my mileage from the recommended “walk a minute/ run a minute” to running 3 miles straight in the course of a week.
All of that is better now thank you, but last week I did a doozy of a job burning my hand. I will spare you the gory details, and trust me they are quite gory, but after a few days of pretending it was all fine, I ended up at the doctor, the emergency room and yet another emergency room, before finally being admitted to the hospital.

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I burn myself a lot. As anyone who cooks like I do will tell you, burns are a part of the process. I inevitably have a couple of little marks on my arms as reminders of great meals past.

This one however, was more serious.

The moral of the story, is that if you have an injury that is large, extreme and doesn’t stop hurting/bleeding/swelling/oozing, do as I say, not as I do, and head to the doctor immediately. Many ERs now have a fast track area that deals with these non-life threatening emergencies that require treatment that often can’t be provided by your local doctor. (IV antibiotics, X-rays and MRI’s, wound treatment and stitches: you get the idea!) The first visit had me in and out in 45 minutes, a world record for a New York City ER.  If you think it might be serious, go see a doctor!!

Today’s kitchen tips are for those little pesky burns that don’t require either hospitalization or shots of morphine just to take a shower and get them bandaged (for reals!).  These are quick remedies often found in the kitchen to soothe those mildly singed areas and help prevent scarring or infection.

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A teabag can act as a soothing compress, and the tannic acid present in black tea helps to draw the heat from the burn. Soaking a teabag in cool water and applying it directly to the area should provide some relief. Some advocate using the tea leaves as a poultice, and dabbing them directly on the burn before covering the area with gauze.

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When honey is applied to a burn, it draws out fluids from the affected area, and acts as a disinfectant. It also keeps the skin soft, and supple as it heals.
Apply honey to the wound, and cover it with a gauze bandage. Change the bandage several times throughout the day.

Vinegar has antiseptic properties that can cleanse the burn and help dull the pain. Mix equal parts vinegar and water, and use it clean the area. Placing a cloth soaked in the mixture directly on the wound is said to help ease the pain.

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Rubbing a raw potato over a burn is said to reduce pain and prevent blisters. Apply the cut side to the burn immediately, for optimum effects.

Milk is another food with soothing properties.  Soaking the affected area in milk or plain yogurt is recommended to take the burn out of the wound. Repeat every few hours, being sure to use fresh dairy products each time.

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Freshly cut onions are also thought to be a good treatment, as the quercetin and sulphur compounds help to relieve the pain, and prevent blistering. Work quickly, as the onion loses its medicinal properties soon after it is cut. You may not smell very good, but people swear by the results!

Remember to keep the burn clean, and moist at all times. The doctors at the Burn Unit I was in are big fans of Bacitracin, which keeps the wound clean, infection free, and moist while it heals. And hopefully, mine will!

Photos: Glasshouse Images

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Vampire Weekend

May 17, 2013

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Garlic is not only tasty, but it’s also good for your health. Studies have shown that consuming garlic, from a supplement or the actual plant is proven to reduce blood pressure as much as some prescription drugs. Eating four or more cloves per day, is also thought to lower bad cholesterol (LDL)by 9% and the risk of colon cancer by 30%.

The downside of garlic is the pungent odor on your breath, which can linger for several days. Unless you are looking to fend off a vampire attack, that can be an unpleasant side effect. According to a new study in the Journal of Food Science, drinking a glass of low fat milk along with your garlic heavy meal can keep your breath smelling fresh. Researchers are also testing the effects of lemon juice and green tea, in preventing the dreaded garlic breath.

So, go ahead and indulge in a garlicky meal, just be sure to drink your milk. Your bones, and your significant other will thank you.

photo: Glasshouse Images

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Milking It

October 9, 2012

Recently, a friend asked my opinion on alternative milks. There are so many options out there right now, that it is hard to figure out which is the right milk for your diet.

Cow’s milk is the first type we think of. Even that comes in a variety of versions, from skim, 1% and 2% milk fat, lactose free, and regular, not to mention, organic, conventional and antibiotic and hormone free.

Cow’s milk contains high levels of calcium and vitamin D, which are essential to bone health. It is also a good source of protein.

Regular milk contains about 150 calories per cup, and half of those calories come from fat, and cholesterol. Skimmed or fat free versions, offer the same benefits, and significantly fewer calories; about 86 per cup.

For those who are not on a dairy free diet, or are lactose intolerant, fat free or 1% milk seems the way to go. Antibiotic and hormone free is a non-negotiable in my book.

Soy milk gained prominence several years ago, as a good plant based alternative to cow’s milk. It is fortified to have the same levels of protein, calcium, vitamins A and D, and potassium. Because it is a plant product, it has no cholesterol and is usually low in fat. However, many soy milks are artificially flavored, which means there is a wide swing in calorie and sugar counts. While the plain versions pack only about 70-80 calories per cup, the flavored and sweetened types can have as much as 160 calories per cup and 19 grams of sugar. It is a great alternative for those who cannot tolerate dairy, or are vegan; just beware the artificial sweeteners or high sugar contents.

Almond milk seems to be the current milk option of choice. It contains no cholesterol, or lactose. It also contains much less protein and calcium than the other milks. It is a great source of iron, vitamin E and omega 6 fatty acids. Nuts have been linked to lower cholesterol and reduced risk of heart disease. However, not all commercial almond milks are filled with almonds. There are also lots of sweetened and flavored versions on the market that add calories and sugar. The average cup of unsweetened almond milk has only 30-40 calories. It is a good option for those looking to avoid lactose, or dairy in general, or use a lower calorie, vegan substitute for cow’s milk.

Coconut milk is another vegan choice that is gaining popularity. It has only 50 calories per cup and no cholesterol. It does not contain the same amount of protein and calcium as cow’s milk, but does have some healthy fatty acids not found in other milks. It is dairy and lactose free, and like the others, comes in a variety of flavors.

Rice milk is another alternative, with lower levels of protein and calcium than cow’s milk. Its relatively mild taste makes it less necessary to buy a flavored variety. Plain rice milk contains 113 calories per cup, making it the most caloric of the plant based milks. It is good for those who have allergies to soy, dairy, or nuts, and cannot tolerate some of the other options.

When looking for the perfect type of milk, choose something that tastes good and suits your dietary concerns. Remember that while cow’s milk is a great source of protein, calcium and vitamin D, there are lots of other ways to get those elements in your diet. A balanced diet gets its nutrition from a variety of sources, and is not reliant on one food group to provide the healthy daily requirements that are a key to a good diet.


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