Posts Tagged ‘meat’

Kitchen Tips Tuesday: Spice Rubs

December 8, 2015

4989100106_comp

Spice rubs are a great way to infuse flavor into meats and poultry. While many commercial blends are available, you can make your own using the herbs and spices that suit your taste and your specific recipe.

Here are a few tips to using seasonings:

Brush your meat or poultry with olive oil or butter to give the spices something to stick to.

Mix your seasonings in a small bowl before you start. This will allow for much more even distribution of the spices.

Remember that uncooked meats carry the risk of foodborne pathogens, such as E.coli and salmonella which are destroyed when cooked. When handling raw meats, be sure to clean everything that the meat or poultry and their juices might have touched. Using a small bowl for seasonings allows you to “double dip” without contaminating everything by touching various spice jars with the hands that are also touching the meat. Just remember to throw out the excess after you are done, to avoid spreading the bacteria to other foods.

Massaging the seasonings into the meat allows it absorb better, giving you more flavor. Even salt and pepper benefit from a little rub.

Photo: Glasshouse Images

Check us out at indigojonesnyc on instagram.

Want to see what we have been pinning? Take a look at our Pinterest page!

Tweet along on Twitter.

Take a peek at our Tumblr.

To keep up with the latest, show us some “like” by liking our Facebook page

Check out our new site Indigo Jones Eats

Visit our shops on Gourmly Ecohabitude, Lemonbar and Etsy

Download the HOMEMADE app

Advertisements

Diet Riot

November 2, 2015

 

1039100045_compDietary issues have become the norm these days. Whether food aversions, part of a health plan, fads or actual allergies, it seems everyone has something they want to avoid. In order to ensure compliance to their various and sundry food schticks, people are telling restaurant servers that they are highly allergic to whatever they don’t wish to eat. While that seems like a worthy plan, it turns the kitchen upside down.

When someone says they have a food allergy, the kitchen must stop everything and create an area that is 100% contaminent free. This means clearing and cleaning a special work area to prepare that single meal, sterilizing all of the cutting boards, knives, tongs pans and other equipment that might be used to prepare the food. Once the food has been prepared in this special environment, it is often brought to the patron by a hostess or manager, who has not touched any other dishes. They use a clean towel, or disinfectant wipe to touch the plate. This is mandatory practice to ensure that the food is free of anything that might make it’s recipient sick.
When we say we have an allergy when in reality we simply are trying to avoid a certain ingredient, we are causing the kitchen to undergo extreme and unnecessary measures.

When I was in the throes of my highly restrictive Whole 3o diet plan, I had the occassion to eat out a few times. I selected the menu item that was closest to being compliant, and asked for a few simple modifications. I remember distinctly telling the server that I was on a restricted diet and could not eat certain foods, but was not allergic and did not require them to clean the kitchen or make special provisions for me. I am sure it was appreciated, and my meal seemed to come out in perfect compliance to my requests, even if it may have been cooked in a pan that formerly held butter, or was touched by someone who had cooked a legume for someone else.

I recently read an article about a young women who never considered asking if the chili had nuts, and died before discovering that the secret ingredient to the famous chili she ate was in fact, peanut butter.
If you have a food allergy, it is important to let your server know so that they can be sure that there are no suprise ingredients in your food that might make you ill. If you are simply trying to avoid a certain food, it is prudent to tell them that as well. They can steer you to dishes that are closer to meeting your dietary needs, and can request that the chef alters your order to suit you, without wrecking havoc in the kitchen. And please, don’t be the boy who cried wolf. Servers report frustration in seeing the person who had just inflicted turmoil in the kitchen eating a bite of someone else’s food riddled with the ingredient they worked so hard to eliminate. If you can’t have gluten in your entree, please don’t order cake for dessert.
When dining out, be aware of your food issues, and choose a place that can easily accommodate them. Don’t go to a seafood shack with a shellfish allergy, a pizza place with a gluten sensitivity, or a fondue shop with lactose intolerence. If you have an allergy, make it known, but don’t abuse that option if in fact you just don’t like something. Everyone will benefit in the long run.

Photo: Glasshouse Images

Check us out at indigojonesnyc on instagram.

Want to see what we have been pinning? Take a look at our Pinterest page!

Tweet along on Twitter.

Take a peek at our Tumblr.

To keep up with the latest, show us some “like” by liking our Facebook page

Check out our new site Indigo Jones Eats

Visit our shops on Gourmly and Etsy

Download the HOMEMADE app

Everything Is NOT Better With Bacon

October 27, 2015

 

4093601285_compThe World Health Organization has officially classified processed meats, such bacon, ham and hot dogs as carcinogenic to humans. They also state that other forms of red meat probably are too. No sugar coating, no beating around the bush, just a clear, concise statement that the consumption of these products could, in fact be deadly.

The group cited sufficient evidence that consumption of processed meats can lead to colorectal and stomach cancers. Eating red meat in general has been associated with pancreatic and prostate cancers.

The average American consumes what is now known to be extremely dangerous quantities of meat, as do other cultures. The release of this information, if the warnings are heeded, could lead to a significant decrease in cancer cases annually.

I personally am not a meat eater, but I will certainly be cutting back the amount of meat my family eats, starting today. Will you?

Photo: Glasshouse Images

Check us out at indigojonesnyc on instagram.

Want to see what we have been pinning? Take a look at our Pinterest page!

Tweet along on Twitter.

Take a peek at our Tumblr.

To keep up with the latest, show us some “like” by liking our Facebook page

Check out our new site Indigo Jones Eats

Visit our shops on Gourmly and Etsy

Download the HOMEMADE app

Kitchen Tips Tuesday: Preheating

November 4, 2014

7091300413

We always preheat the oven before we start cooking and we would never consider putting food into a cold frying pan, yet most of us overlook this step when roasting foods in the oven.

Once the oven is preheated, place the pan you will be using in it for a few minutes to heat. If you will be using fat, add the butter or oil at this point, allowing it to melt and coat the pan. When you add the meat, chicken or vegetables to the hot pan, they will sear, getting a nice caramelized edge as the food continues to cook.

photo: Glasshouse Images

Check us out at indigojonesnyc on instagram.

Want to see what we have been pinning? Take a look at our Pinterest page!

Tweet along on Twitter.

To keep up with the latest, show us some “like” by liking our Facebook page

Unrecipe of the Week: Balsamic Marinade

July 22, 2013

4556800273

It’s grilling season, and marinades help lock in moisture and add flavor to foods.

Whether you are tossing meat, chicken or vegetables on the barbeque, or cooking in the oven, this unrecipe will become a staple in your repertoire.

Balsamic Marinade:

Combine ½ cup balsamic vinegar, juice of 2 lemons, ½ cup olive oil, a big dollop or two of Dijon mustard, a couple of minced garlic cloves, and salt and pepper. Whisk to blend. Pour over meat or chicken and allow it to marinate for several hours or overnight. Vegetables should be marinated for a very short time, to avoid getting soggy.

Kitchen tip:

Never pour leftover marinade that the raw meat has been soaking in over cooked food. Once the food has been put on the grill, use a clean plate to remove it to avoid contamination.

Bringing the leftover marinade to a full boil for a couple of minutes will kill any bacteria and allow the sauce to be safely used. Cooking it for 5 or 10 minutes will allow the liquid to reduce, and give you a slightly thicker consistency for a finishing sauce.

Like us on Facebook, follow us on TwitterTumblr and Pinterest too!

photo: Glasshouse Images

 


%d bloggers like this: