Posts Tagged ‘honey’

Unrecipe of the Week: Slow Cooker Pulled Pork

January 25, 2016

IMG_4853

New York is experiencing a blizzard today, and everyone is longing for something warm, and hearty. Slow days like this call for slow cooking. This dish has all the right elements for a snow day. It comes together in no time, and fills the house with a delicious aroma of things to come. It is also made from things I have on hand since venturing out to the grocery store is not really an option.

This is one of the easiest ways to use the slow cooker, as this pulled pork requires no marinating, no pre-searing of the meat and almost no mess. Simply place the pork tenderloin in  the slow cooker, add the one bowl sauce, and let it cook. Later, the tender, juicy meat can be shredded and served on fluffy brioche buns for a comfort food sandwich that everyone will enjoy.

Slow Cooker Pulled Pork: ( adapted from Le Creme de la Crumb)

Place a pork tenderloin into the slow cooker bowl.

In a separate bowl mix together 1/2 cup of balsamic vinegar, 1 cup of water, 1/4 cup of honey, 3 tablespoons of brown sugar and 2 tablespoons of soy sauce. Add a couple of diced garlic cloves and about 1/2 of a small onion finely diced. Sprinkle the pork with a black pepper and pour the sauce over it.
Cover, and cook at high for about 4 1/2 -5 hours.

Drain the sauce into a sauce pan and bring to a slow boil. Mix together a tablespoon of cornstarch and a some water until it forms a smooth paste. Whisk a little at a time into the sauce, and let it simmer for a few minutes until thickened.

In the meantime, use forks to shred the pork. Alternatively, you can toss it into the electric mixer with the paddle attachment, and mix on a low speed until it shreds. (It is easier, but you have to wash another bowl, and frankly, who wants to do that? But to each his own!)

Serve on toasted brioche buns and enjoy!

Photo: Spencer Jones Glasshouse Assignment

Check us out at indigojonesnyc on instagram.

Want to see what we have been pinning? Take a look at our Pinterest page!

Tweet along on Twitter.

Take a peek at our Tumblr.

To keep up with the latest, show us some “like” by liking our Facebook page

Check out our new site Indigo Jones Eats

Visit our shops on Gourmly EcohabitudeLemonbar and Etsy

Download the HOMEMADE app

Advertisements

Unrecipe of the Week: Honey Roasted Chickpeas

February 9, 2015

 

2117900540_comp

I am always looking for a snack that is healthy, not processed, and low in calories and carbs to satisfy my crunchy, salty, sweet cravings.

I’ve spoken before about my addiction to Trader Joe’s trail mixes. They almost fit the bill. That is, if I could stop at just a tiny little handful. I cannot. They are my crack.

Chickpeas are an often forgotten health food. They are high in protein and fiber, and are iron rich. One half cup of chickpeas contains 134 calories, and 7 grams of protien.

This recipe takes these little gems and roasts them up to a delicate crunch. The spices add a little heat, and the honey provides just a touch of sweetness. While chickpeas do contain a reasonable amount of calories, they are filling enough to allow me to stop after just a handful or two. They are easy to make and keep well in the refrigerator, so you can grab a few when the afternoon munchies take hold.

Spicy Honey Roasted Chickpeas

Rinse a large can of chickpeas and spread them on paper towels to dry. They need to be dry before cooking or they will stay soft.

Mix 2 tablespoons or so of cumin, garlic salt, and paprika together in a large bowl. Add about a 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon of cayenne pepper, depending on how hot you like things. Add a couple of tablespoons of a nuetral flavored oil, such as canola, grapeseed or sunflower seed oil, and 1 large tablespoon of honey. Mix well. Stir in the chickpeas and toss to coat.

Spread the chickpeas on a rimmed baking sheet covered with parchment paper and bake in a 350 degree oven for 30 or 40 minutes until crisp. Shake the pan every 10 minutes during baking to roll the chickpeas around, allowing them to brown more evenly.

Allow to cool slightly, and enjoy!
Store them in an airtight container in the refrigerator if you are not going to eat them right away.

Photo: Glasshouse Images

Check us out at indigojonesnyc on instagram.

Want to see what we have been pinning? Take a look at our Pinterest page!

Tweet along on Twitter.

Take a peek at our Tumblr.

To keep up with the latest, show us some “like” by liking our Facebook page

Unrecipe of the Week: Moroccan Chicken Tagine

December 11, 2013

4093600953-1

Those of you who follow us on Facebook ( and you really should!) know that I got a slow cooker as a gift. Those of you that follow this blog, know that I am more of a fast cooker type, using fresh ingredients to create seasonal, flavorful and simple dishes. I admit to being a bit intimidated by this concept of slow cooking, and put off trying it out. Finally, on the days leading up to Thanksgiving, I was home long enough to attempt to try it out. First, I did my due diligence, researching recipes, and reading the comments. Many of the readers complained that the cooking times were off. There was lots of conversation about too much liquid, or not enough. Many of the recipes were for dishes I simply don’t care for. Finally, I stumbled upon a recipe for a Moroccan Style Chicken Tagine, with dried apricots and chickpeas. The comments were all favorable, and dish did not disappoint. The rich flavorful stew that accompanies the chicken is hearty and tasty enough to hold its own as a vegetarian dish, with a few minor tweaks ( like losing the chicken!).

1822600054

I learned a few lessons experimenting with the slow cooker:

Just tossing the ingredients into the pot and turning it on isn’t going to happen very often. Browning meats, sauteing onions, and finishing sauces on the stove top are part of the success of slow cooked foods. This (un) recipe, is adapted from the Kitchn, and requires a bit of before and after work, but the results were worth the extra effort, and the added mess.

Moroccan Chicken Tagine with Apricots and Chickpeas:

Sprinkle chicken pieces with salt and pepper and brown them in olive oil until golden. Work in batches if necessary, until all pieces are done.  Transfer them to the slow cooker.

Using the same pan, saute one diced onion and 2 peeled and diced carrots in olive oil, until soft and slightly brown. Add 2 or 3 minced garlic cloves, and a chunk of ginger root, peeled and minced to the pan, and cook for about 1 minute. Add 1 teaspoon or so of cumin, and cinnamon. Continue to saute until mixed.  Pour the mixture over the chicken. Add 1 cup of chicken stock, and a few large handfuls of dried apricots, chopped.

Turn the slow cooker up to high, and cook for roughly 4 -5 hours.

4093602000

Remove the chicken from the cooker, and place on a platter, covered with foil to keep warm. Pour the sauce, including the fruit and vegetables into a pan, add 1 tablespoon of honey, and 1 can of chickpeas, drained and rinsed.  Simmer until the sauce reduces a bit and starts to thicken.

Season with salt and pepper to taste. Pour the finished sauce over the chicken and sprinkle with chopped almonds.

Serve on a bed of cous cous and enjoy!

photos: Glasshouse Images

Like us on Facebook, follow us on TwitterTumblr, Instagram and Pinterest too!

Kitchen Tips Tuesday: Apples

September 10, 2013

4330300025

The arrival of fall also signals the arrival of apple season.  We love apple sauce, and apple pies, and apples chopped into salads. The unappetizing way they turn brown once they are cut, not so much.

There are natural ways to prevent the brown stuff.

A squeeze of lemon juice is the most widely used method for keeping apples from turning colors. The vitamin C and citric acid in lemon juice helps prevent oxidization. It does add an additional tartness, which is sometimes not desirable.

For a sweeter alternative, try a mixture of 2 parts water to 1 part honey. The peptides in honey also prevent the fruit from oxidizing.

photo: Glasshouse Images

Like us on Facebook, follow us on TwitterTumblr, Instagram and Pinterest too!

Kitchen Tips Tuesday: Burn Treatments

June 11, 2013

As a continuation of my series of “Unfortunate Events”, I spent a few days last week in the Cornell Burn Unit at New York Hospital.  I know what you are thinking: Yes, I did just finish physical therapy on a fractured knee. Mmmhmm, I did hurt my foot after a triumphant return to the gym and taking my mileage from the recommended “walk a minute/ run a minute” to running 3 miles straight in the course of a week.
All of that is better now thank you, but last week I did a doozy of a job burning my hand. I will spare you the gory details, and trust me they are quite gory, but after a few days of pretending it was all fine, I ended up at the doctor, the emergency room and yet another emergency room, before finally being admitted to the hospital.

ZC8X8120 SH Hosp Bedmail

I burn myself a lot. As anyone who cooks like I do will tell you, burns are a part of the process. I inevitably have a couple of little marks on my arms as reminders of great meals past.

This one however, was more serious.

The moral of the story, is that if you have an injury that is large, extreme and doesn’t stop hurting/bleeding/swelling/oozing, do as I say, not as I do, and head to the doctor immediately. Many ERs now have a fast track area that deals with these non-life threatening emergencies that require treatment that often can’t be provided by your local doctor. (IV antibiotics, X-rays and MRI’s, wound treatment and stitches: you get the idea!) The first visit had me in and out in 45 minutes, a world record for a New York City ER.  If you think it might be serious, go see a doctor!!

Today’s kitchen tips are for those little pesky burns that don’t require either hospitalization or shots of morphine just to take a shower and get them bandaged (for reals!).  These are quick remedies often found in the kitchen to soothe those mildly singed areas and help prevent scarring or infection.

1635400061

A teabag can act as a soothing compress, and the tannic acid present in black tea helps to draw the heat from the burn. Soaking a teabag in cool water and applying it directly to the area should provide some relief. Some advocate using the tea leaves as a poultice, and dabbing them directly on the burn before covering the area with gauze.

4093601587

When honey is applied to a burn, it draws out fluids from the affected area, and acts as a disinfectant. It also keeps the skin soft, and supple as it heals.
Apply honey to the wound, and cover it with a gauze bandage. Change the bandage several times throughout the day.

Vinegar has antiseptic properties that can cleanse the burn and help dull the pain. Mix equal parts vinegar and water, and use it clean the area. Placing a cloth soaked in the mixture directly on the wound is said to help ease the pain.

4263000298

Rubbing a raw potato over a burn is said to reduce pain and prevent blisters. Apply the cut side to the burn immediately, for optimum effects.

Milk is another food with soothing properties.  Soaking the affected area in milk or plain yogurt is recommended to take the burn out of the wound. Repeat every few hours, being sure to use fresh dairy products each time.

4093601212

Freshly cut onions are also thought to be a good treatment, as the quercetin and sulphur compounds help to relieve the pain, and prevent blistering. Work quickly, as the onion loses its medicinal properties soon after it is cut. You may not smell very good, but people swear by the results!

Remember to keep the burn clean, and moist at all times. The doctors at the Burn Unit I was in are big fans of Bacitracin, which keeps the wound clean, infection free, and moist while it heals. And hopefully, mine will!

Photos: Glasshouse Images

Like us on Facebook, follow us on TwitterTumblr and Pinterest too!

Kitchen Tip Tuesday: Sticky Situations

April 30, 2013

Honey spoon

Measuring sticky ingredients, such as honey or molasses can be a mess. Next time a recipe calls for a sticky item, spray the measuring cup or spoon with a light coating of cooking spray. The sticky sweetness will drip right out!

photo: Glasshouse Images

Unrecipe of the Week: Grapefruit + Avocado Salad With Seared Tuna + Scallops

April 15, 2013

My favorite fish market is finally open again after a long remodel, so seafood is definitely on the menu tonight. As the weather tries to turn springlike in New York City, I am craving bright, citrusy flavors. A quick trip to Chelsea Market provided the inspiration needed to create this light meal.

IMG_1554

Seared fresh tuna and scallops are set on a bed of arugula, shaved radish, grapefruit sections and avocado, all drizzled in a grapefruit vinaigrette. The spiciness of the arugula and heat of the radish, balance out the sweetness of the grapefruit. While I chose to cube and sear the tuna, this could be done with a filet of any type of broiled fish, and served along side of the salad.

For the salad:

Peel the grapefruit, removing all of the white pith, and cut the sections over a bowl. I cut the grapefruit into large wedges, trimmed the inner white membrane, and used a small paring knife to remove the rind. I did this over a bowl in order to catch the juice. Remove the fruit and reserve the juice for the dressing.

Coarsely chop one head of arugula.

Finely slice a large radish or two. I happen to hate raw onion, but for those of you not adverse, a little finely diced red onion could be a nice addition.

Peel and cut an avocado into chunks. Mix the arugula, radish, avocado and grapefruit sections in a bowl. Toss lightly with the dressing and mound on plates.

For the vinaigrette:

Whisk a few tablespoons of the grapefruit juice with a olive oil, a little honey, and some balsamic vinegar together in a bowl. Taste to achieve the desired level of tartness.

For the seafood:

Season the tuna cubes and scallops with sea salt, black pepper and a little olive oil. Sear at very high heat until browned on one side, flip and sear the other side. Remove the tuna while it is still a rare.

Arrange the fish on top of the salad, and drizzle with a little of the warmed vinaigrette. Enjoy!

Follow us on FacebookPinterestTumblr and Twitter!

Easter-over

March 30, 2013

Tonight we are celebrating “Easter-over” a hybrid of Easter, Passover and a celebration of spring. It’s an opportunity to indulge in the flavors and traditions of the holidays, and the diversity of the guests. The rules are simple: it’s my made up holiday,and  it’s appropriate to serve anything I feel like making, within the confines of the season and the holidays. That could mean matzoh balls and pork chops, or gefilte fish and fried chicken, but it’s not either one of those.
This year, I have mixed it up, and for those of you who follow us on Facebook, or Instagram, you have been getting hints of things to come.

Here are a few “works in progress”, as our Easter-over feast comes together:

A beautiful mess of food scraps. What were they from?

IMG_1536

Personally, I loathe raw, red onions, and will surgically remove them from my food if they are there. Sometimes, a recipe really needs a little jolt, and these do the job well. They look pretty, don’t they?

IMG_1544

Nothing says spring like daffodils and asparagus!

IMG_1545

Apples, walnuts, honey, cinnamon….what could this be?

IMG_1543

Yum,chocolate! That’s a little almond flour you see. This one just happens to be gluten free and passover approved!

IMG_1537

Maybe a little white chocolate bourbon cream to put on top would be nice…

IMG_1540

Spring lamb is synonymous with the season. This one has a rosemary,garlic coating to keep it moist and flavorful. The meat is sitting on a bed of baby fingerling potatoes, which should get crisp and tender as the lamb cooks.

IMG_1546

Did we get you hungry yet? If you’re in the neighborhood, dinner is at 7!

photos by indigo-jones.

Influenza Sorbet

January 23, 2013

1231000458

While we find the name a bit unappealing, this sounds like the perfect way to soothe a sore throat.

Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams has unveiled a new flavor called “ Influenza Sorbet.

This frozen treat contains Maker’s Mark bourbon, orange and lemon juices, ginger, honey and a dash of cayenne pepper. Sounds a little like a cross between Master Cleanse lemonade and a frozen “hot toddy” to us, which just might do the trick!

It’s available on the company’s website and their own scoop shops for $12 per pint.

photo: Glasshouse Images

 

Hangover Helper

December 31, 2012

7764600015 New Year’s Eve is upon us, and the celebration often involves large quantities of alcohol, resulting in an inevitable hangover.

While resolving to practice moderation might not work in “real time,” having the right foods on hand to ease the effects of over- indulging is a good idea.

Here are a few foods that are hangover helpers:

2117900036

Asparagus contains enzymes that help breakdown the alcohol in your body. Eating asparagus for dinner can jumpstart the process. Asparagus is also a natural diuretic, which will not only help the alcohol pass through your system more quickly, but will also help avoid the bloating associated with a night of indulgence.

Coconut water contains the same amount of electrolytes as many of the popular sports drinks, without all the sugar and additives.  An earlier study found that Zico Natural Pure Premium Coconut Water contains the most electrolytes of the conventional brands.

4093601758

Bananas are rich in potassium, which will strengthen your muscles and help overcome that weak shaky feeling, often experienced after a binge.

Tomato juice is a great way to hydrate, and is packed with vitamins and minerals that are depleted after a night of partying.

Organic, Pasteurized Eggs contain protein, which breaks down toxins in your body.
Eggs produced by grass fed hens replenish vitamin B levels as well.

8147100086

Quinoa is a trendy grain and a health powerhouse. It helps to restore amino acids lost during drinking and absorbs a little of that “icky” feeling in your stomach. Just remember to rinse the quinoa before cooking it, to make it easier on your digestive system.

Honey is loaded with antioxidants and naturally occurring fructose, which helps flush out the system. Drink it in some soothing tea, add it to your quinoa for a morning meal, or spread it on some toast.

glass of water

Much of what you are feeling the morning after is a result of dehydration. Try sipping a glass of water between cocktails, and be sure to down a large glass before bed. Sipping water throughout the next day will provide ample rehydration, and flush out your system.

Whatever you do, please don’t drink and drive! Plan ahead for transportation home from the celebration to insure a happy and safe New Year.
Happy 2013!!

photos: Glasshouse Images


%d bloggers like this: