Posts Tagged ‘grapefruit’

Unrecipe of the Week: Poptails

August 8, 2016

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This has been one of the hottest summers on the record books. Cold rosé is being turned into “frozé” and cocktails are being frozen into pops to help beat the heat. Last weekend, I hosted a few ladies for brunch, and we kicked off the day with a refreshing “poptail,” to get our party started. Later, as the guys came by to join us, they were starting to get a bit melted. No worries there; we simply plopped them in a glass and poured some champagne over them for a drink that was part kir royale, and part smoothie. Either way, it was a hit!
While this recipe is super simple and tasty, you could take almost any summer cocktail and freeze them in ice pop molds with good results. Besides, isn’t everything better on a stick?

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Strawberry Grapefruit Poptails

Place 1 pound of strawberries, washed and hulled into the blender. Add about 1 cup of grapefruit juice (fresh is best, but unsweetened natural juice is fine too!) and puree until thick and smooth. Add about 5-6 oz. of vodka and blend.

Pour the mixture into ice pop molds and freeze until the are just starting to solidify. Place the sticks in the molds and freeze until firm.

To remove from the mold, run the bottoms under warm water to make them easier to pull out and enjoy!

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Unrecipe of the Week: Grapefruit + Avocado Salad With Seared Tuna + Scallops

April 15, 2013

My favorite fish market is finally open again after a long remodel, so seafood is definitely on the menu tonight. As the weather tries to turn springlike in New York City, I am craving bright, citrusy flavors. A quick trip to Chelsea Market provided the inspiration needed to create this light meal.

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Seared fresh tuna and scallops are set on a bed of arugula, shaved radish, grapefruit sections and avocado, all drizzled in a grapefruit vinaigrette. The spiciness of the arugula and heat of the radish, balance out the sweetness of the grapefruit. While I chose to cube and sear the tuna, this could be done with a filet of any type of broiled fish, and served along side of the salad.

For the salad:

Peel the grapefruit, removing all of the white pith, and cut the sections over a bowl. I cut the grapefruit into large wedges, trimmed the inner white membrane, and used a small paring knife to remove the rind. I did this over a bowl in order to catch the juice. Remove the fruit and reserve the juice for the dressing.

Coarsely chop one head of arugula.

Finely slice a large radish or two. I happen to hate raw onion, but for those of you not adverse, a little finely diced red onion could be a nice addition.

Peel and cut an avocado into chunks. Mix the arugula, radish, avocado and grapefruit sections in a bowl. Toss lightly with the dressing and mound on plates.

For the vinaigrette:

Whisk a few tablespoons of the grapefruit juice with a olive oil, a little honey, and some balsamic vinegar together in a bowl. Taste to achieve the desired level of tartness.

For the seafood:

Season the tuna cubes and scallops with sea salt, black pepper and a little olive oil. Sear at very high heat until browned on one side, flip and sear the other side. Remove the tuna while it is still a rare.

Arrange the fish on top of the salad, and drizzle with a little of the warmed vinaigrette. Enjoy!

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Natural Detoxifiers

January 3, 2013

It’s the beginning of a new year, and the end of the period of over-indulgence that spans from late November until early January. Before you do something dramatic, like start a juice cleanse, consider adding some of these naturally detoxifying foods to your diet.

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Broccoli helps the body eliminate toxins while providing a healthy dose of vitamins.

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Cucumbers are high in water content, and flush out the system.

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Cauliflower has anti-inflammatory properties, and is also an anti-oxidant.

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Grapefruit is high in fiber, and helps to prevent the formation of kidney stones, and lower cholesterol. It is also a digestive aid.

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Lentils are also high in fiber, which aids in elimination, as well as lowering blood sugar.

Sunflower seeds

Sunflower seeds are high in vitamin E and selenium, which helps the liver filter toxins. They are also known to prevent arterial buildup.

Adding these foods to your diet will kick start a healthy eating plan for 2013!

photos: Glasshouse Images

The Clean 15

June 5, 2012

We have written here about the “Dirty Dozen,” a list of produce that has the highest levels of pesticides and contamination. It is recommended that these foods be organic wherever possible.

There is another list called the “Clean 15”, which have the lowest pesticide load, and can be enjoyed in the conventional varieties.

These are:

Onions

Sweet corn

Pineapples

Avocado

Sweet peas

Mangoes

Eggplant

Cantaloupe

Kiwi

Watermelon

Sweet potatoes

Grapefruit

Mushrooms

Asparagus

Other foods, such as broccoli, cabbage and tomatoes have more recently tested cleaner as well, due to less pest threats, and therefore less spraying.

Many of these fruits and vegetables have a protective outer layer that gets peeled or removed before eating. This helps eliminate the toxins, which are largely on the outside of the food.

The current list of the most harmful foods tested positive for at least 47 different chemicals, and as many as 67. Buying organic insures that the fruit and vegetables are not treated with harmful pesticides.

Foods that should be organic:

Celery

Strawberries

Peaches

Apples

Blueberries

Nectarines

Sweet bell peppers

Spinach, kale and collard greens

Cherries

Potatoes

Grapes

Lettuce

This lists were compiled by the Environmental Working Group, which is an organization made up of scientists, researchers and policymakers. The data used was supplied by the United States Department of Agriculture’s tests for pesticide residue on fresh produce.

photos: Glasshouse Images

 


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