Posts Tagged ‘eating’

In The News

February 15, 2016

You can now make money selling off your leftovers

 You can now make money selling off your leftovers

Would you order takeout from the apartment next door?

Hundreds of New Yorkers are. Homemade, a new app that launched last month, connects industrious home cooks with adventurous eaters hungry to buy cookies and curries from strangers.

Simon Bowden, 63, is a creative director at a Manhattan advertising agency — and a baker.

Simon Bowden’s sourdough breadPhoto: Zandy Mangold

In his 10-by-8-foot kitchen on the Upper East Side, he whips up fresh loaves of sourdough that are eagerly snapped up by Homemade users.

“It’s fun [making] bread and giving it to your friends and family,” says Bowden, who makes four loaves at a time several days a week and sells them for $10 to $12 each, just enough to cover ingredients. “But someone purchasing it from you — a stranger — and eating it and liking it and then buying it again, is quite exciting and different.”

Bowden is one of about 150 amateur chefs in the tri-state area using Homemade. The platform was cooked up by Nick Devane, 24, and Mike Dee, 25, who previously owned a downtown coffee shop together.

Wannabe chefs apply to the app via an online form, and the two men review their qualifications.

Once on the app, cooks can post a dish, the price and the time it will be ready. Customers pay a 9 percent fee to Homemade, on top of a food’s list price.

Devan and Dee ask if chefs have a food handler’s license, caterer’s license or USDA-certified kitchen, but they do not require them.

The New York City Health Department, which was not familiar with Homemade, says in a statement, “New Yorkers are welcome to prepare meals for friends and family, but not sell them to the public.”

Devane insists that the app is “completely legal” and they’re “working with some folks” to figure out how to best regulate safety.

Users don’t seem to mind the potential health code violations.

“You’d be surprised how many people trust you,” says Nicole Russell, 43, a multimedia designer who sells pizzas on Homemade.

Nicole Russell earns about $250 a week selling pizza on Homemade.

She first started making pies in 2012 for construction workers fixing her neighborhood after Hurricane Sandy.

Now, she’s turned it into a profitable side hustle. Her Last Dragon Pizza nets her about $250 a week via Homemade — despite the fact that, like most cooks on the app, she doesn’t deliver. Hungry users trek from Queens and Manhattan to Russell’s home in the Rockaways to pick-up pizzas.

Freelance fashion designer Shari Hershon — who’s worked for Giorgio Armani and Calvin Klein — says she’s not raking in the dough selling handmade s’mores and fortune cookies, but she still loves it.

“To be able to do have a second career and pursue a passion, it’s been really great,” says the 57-year-old wife and mother, who bakes out of her Chelsea loft.

Shari Hershon bakes a wide variety of treats out of her Chelsea loft.Photo: Spencer Jones/Glasshouse Images (3)

But there’s only so much space in city kitchens, as Bowden’s learned. “[My wife] gets a little concerned when I’m buying 50-pound sacks of flour,” he says. “She looks at me like, ‘Are you crazy? In an NYC apartment?’”

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Don’t Start the New Year Fat

December 15, 2014

Girl in party hat, blowing up balloon

It’s holiday season, which often means  lots of celebrations. Celebrations mean food and alcohol, late nights, and skipped workouts.

Today, I overheard a conversation between some women on the mat while stretching after spin class. It went like this: Person 1;” I can’t wait until January, so I can stop eating too much and get back to normal.”

Person 2: “I know, right? I got on the scale and couldn’t believe my eyes. I will get on track after the first of the year.”

Male person 3: Why not just reel it in now?

{crickets}

Sorry ladies, but the guy is right. It’s easy to over indulge at a party, and it’s also perfectly ok to do so once in a while. But every meal is not a party, and there is ample opportunity to practice good judgement to offset the less healthy treats you will be partaking in later.

It’s a slippery slope. We get off track, and then adopt a WTF attitude for the rest of the week, or the entire holiday season.  I’ve been there. I get it. But this year, I am committed that I am not going to enter a new year feeling bad about myself. I want to start the year off on the right foot.

There is no time like the present, and I have been more diligent than ever to amp up my workouts, and eat healthfully and mindfully when I am home, knowing full well that when I go out I am going to enjoy myself. This doesn’t mean starving myself between treats. That never ends well. It does mean viewing my meals as fuel and nourishment, and not just stuffing cookies in my face. With the recent launch of indigo jones eats, I have been elbow deep in cookie dough and chocolate for days on end. It hasn’t been easy not to sample every batch, but I know I feel better by not doing so.

Here are a few of my personal strategies to manage holiday indulgences:

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1. Know when the parties are, and that is when you are going to throw caution to the wind and imbibe in whatever you want. All other times, eat healthfully.

2. In between, set strict eating guidelines, and stick to them. I have been eating a very high protein, low fat, low carb diet. I make sure that I have the right foods on hand so that I don’t grab the wrong thing when I’m hungry, by default. When I have a craving, I remind myself that I can have whatever I want at the upcoming party. So far, that tactic is working.

3. I consider what the upcoming event might be. Should I eat something first, so I am not at a cocktail party or an open house, eating fattening nibbles instead of a healthy meal? Is it a sit down event with a menu. Can I make a healthy choice for the main course, and then share a dessert?

4. For every cookie, candy, or cheesy, carb-y whatever, ask yourself if it’s worth the calories. Why waste them on a mediocre, stale pastry, when you can walk away and feel good about your self control, and the way your pants fit? If the answer is yes, by the way, go for it!

5.If it’s special, if it’s decadent, if it’s out of this world delicious…eat it, savor it, enjoy it and don’t look back. After all, you only live once.

photo: Glasshouse Images

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Giving Thanks, Eating Well

November 28, 2013

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Today is the big day. It’s like the Superbowl of Eating. If you are health conscious, t’s not a bad idea to have a strategy in place. Here are a few tips and facts to guide you through the feast:

Don’t starve yourself all day in anticipation of the extra calories. Chances are, you will be miserable, and then over binge later.Have small, light meals during the day to keep your strength up, and calories down.

Load up your plate with the healthiest stuff: turkey, salad, vegetables, etc. Pre-game nibbles, like shrimp, hummus and vegetables with dip are better choices than starchy, cheesy appetizers.

We are having a non- creamy soup to begin, followed by a seasonal salad with a dried cranberry vinaigrette. Those types of foods should take the edge off, leaving you less ravenous for the main meal.

Decide what your very favorite dishes are, and take a portion of those first. Skip the others, or just take a little taste of them. Fill the rest of your plate with turkey and clean vegetable side dishes if possible. Creamy casseroles are not healthy diet choices regardless of what the main component of them is, but if you love gratineed squash, go ahead and indulge. It’ s Thanksgiving for goodness sake!

Sweet potatoes, are better choices than white potatoes.

Pumpkin pie is higher in vitamins and lower in calories than pecan pie. I can’t imagine how many calories are in the chocolate pecan tart with salted caramel and whipped cream, but I hope my guests will enjoy it regardless! If that’s your thing, have a small slice and enjoy it.

Move a little after your meal. Go for a walk, help with the dishes, or dance if the mood strikes. Moving around will aid in digestion, leaving you less bloated and sluggish the next day.

Remember that it takes 3500 extra calories to make a pound. Chances are, one meal, however outrageous it may be,  will not make a significant difference in your weight. To relieve the bloat, workout the next day, eat healthfully, and drink lots of water.

Thanksgiving is a time to be reflective about all of the blessings in your life. Don’t beat yourself up over indulging. Instead be grateful for the wonderful food, and the friends and family you shared it with. Tomorrow is a new day!

Happy Thanksgiving to all our supportive readers!

photo: Glasshouse Images

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Nutrition Fiction

May 20, 2013

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While flipping through a popular health and wellness magazine today, I was a little surprised at some of their nutritional suggestions.

I am an armchair expert, admittedly with no formal training in nutrition and look to articles written by others to provide me with much of my information. Through this process, I have a heightened awareness of what is good for you, and what is not. Clearly, some of what I read falls into the latter category.

First up on the agenda: The 2013 Healthy Food Awards.

In this segment, 175 readers blind tested foods that the editors and contributing registered dieticians selected and deemed healthy.

The winners all came in a package, something that generally doesn’t spell “super food” to me.

With categories like “best potato chip”, “best nuked popcorn” and “best chewy granola bar” on the list, it’s hard to grasp the concept of these foods being healthy.

The next page featured celebrity chefs’ recipes using kale, which they dubbed “the holy grail of health.”

Alex Guarnaschelli’s Kale and Watercress Soup has white potatoes, whole milk and heavy cream. It is 252 calories per serving.

I don’t know about you, but the soups I usually enjoy are closer to 80-120 calories per serving. The potatoes, when pureed, should be enough to give the soup a creamy texture, making the heavy cream and milk unnecessary. Using broth instead of the dairy, would probably add more flavor to the soup, and a fraction of the calories and fat.

Instead of the suggested garnish of low fat sour cream, how about recommending a dollop of fat free Greek yogurt? It is lower in calories and fat than the sour cream, and is higher in protein and contains healthy probiotics.

As an avid and well-informed reader, I am concerned that a magazine of this type, would feature foods that are processed, high in saturated fat, and not the best, healthiest versions available. This is not a food magazine, where the flavor and ingredients take center stage, nutritional aspects be damned.

This is a magazine about healthy eating, fitness and wellness. They owe it to their readers to provide them with informed choices. High fat, high calorie soup is not healthy, just because it has a trendy super-food in it.

Processed foods laden with preservatives, huge amounts of sodium and a few unpronounceable ingredients, often in potentially toxic packages, are not healthy, just because they are organic, or lower in calories than their counterparts.

So how does the average consumer get real information about the seemingly healthy foods that are not in fact, as healthy as they seem?

Let me introduce you to a not so secret weapon called Fooducate.
Fooducate is a website and an app for smart phones that offers nutritional profiles culled from a huge database of supermarket foods.  The free app allows you to scan the food’s barcode, and it provides a breakdown of the item’s nutritional data from a list of ingredients to calories, fat and sodium contents, chemicals and preservatives, information about what makes it a good or bad choice, and sums it up with a letter grade. It is a valuable resource for those who want to make wise decisions in the food aisles. The app also offers daily tips, and can help zero in on gluten free or diabetic friendly foods as well.

Perhaps the experts featured in my magazine might benefit from swiping a few of the foods they list, before awarding them best healthy food status.

photo: Glasshouse Images


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