Posts Tagged ‘Easter’

Indigo Jones Eats

March 25, 2015

How often have you looked at our food photos and wished you could actually eat them? Did you know that we have another site called indigo jones eats where you can actually order our sweet treats to go?

We focus on specific holidays, and with Easter and Passover just over a week away, we have a delicous offering ripe for ordering.

Here is a sample of what we are cooking up for you to celebrate the spring holidays…

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Passover begins April 3. These matzo brittle s’mores are so addictively good that you won’t even realize they are Passover treats. We also offer just matzo brittle, a caramel and marbelized chocolate confection that you won’t be able to resist.

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For those thinking about Easter baskets, how about a trio of homemade s’mores in whimsical shapes?

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Why dye hard boiled eggs when you can have decorated egg shaped s’mores?

Looking for something special? Just ask! If we can do it for you we will. And of course our classic s’mores are always available too.

For more information, check out indigojoneseats.

To ensure holiday delivery, please place your order by March 27 if possible.

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Give It Up

February 18, 2015

It is February. It is freezing in most of the country. Those New Year’s resolutions seem so far away, even if it has only been 6 weeks.

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I don’t know about you, but my resolve has weakened a bit. It started with broken cookies. (Insert shameless plug: those homemade graham crackers from indigo jones eats are amazing!) With a double boiler full of melted dark chocolate on the stove from morning until night, I confess that I took to dribbling a little on my fat free Greek yogurt in the morning. Without going any further, I will just state that you would be amazed at what tastes great dipped in a little chocolate.

There have been birthday dinners, followed by an extreme desire to stay in and binge watch series on Netflix and Hulu.

Something has to give, and I think I just found it.
Today, Christians observe Ash Wednesday,which marks the beginning of Lent; a period of “fasting” which extends until Easter Sunday. This is typically a time when they give up something they enjoy for 40 days. Although this time frame is longer, Sundays appear to be fair game.

While I am not Christian, and do not wish to exploit a meaningful religous practice, the idea of giving up something for Lent is kind of appealing to me. It is a good long period of time to let a bad habit go, be it a food, drink, or doing something we know is not good for us. Why not designate this period as a non-denominational time of cleaning up our collective acts? My list of things I could give up is a little longer than usual, but picking just one, and commiting to it could make a big difference in my life.
The idea that it takes 21 days to form a habit has been widely disputed by experts, but certainly 40 days should be enough to at least get on the right track, right?

So who’s with me? What are willing to give up for 40 days to get on track for a better, healthier lifestyle?

photo: glasshouse images

Check us out at indigojonesnyc on instagram.

Want to see what we have been pinning? Take a look at our Pinterest page!

Tweet along on Twitter.

Take a peek at our Tumblr.

To keep up with the latest, show us some “like” by liking our Facebook page

Easter-over

March 30, 2013

Tonight we are celebrating “Easter-over” a hybrid of Easter, Passover and a celebration of spring. It’s an opportunity to indulge in the flavors and traditions of the holidays, and the diversity of the guests. The rules are simple: it’s my made up holiday,and  it’s appropriate to serve anything I feel like making, within the confines of the season and the holidays. That could mean matzoh balls and pork chops, or gefilte fish and fried chicken, but it’s not either one of those.
This year, I have mixed it up, and for those of you who follow us on Facebook, or Instagram, you have been getting hints of things to come.

Here are a few “works in progress”, as our Easter-over feast comes together:

A beautiful mess of food scraps. What were they from?

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Personally, I loathe raw, red onions, and will surgically remove them from my food if they are there. Sometimes, a recipe really needs a little jolt, and these do the job well. They look pretty, don’t they?

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Nothing says spring like daffodils and asparagus!

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Apples, walnuts, honey, cinnamon….what could this be?

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Yum,chocolate! That’s a little almond flour you see. This one just happens to be gluten free and passover approved!

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Maybe a little white chocolate bourbon cream to put on top would be nice…

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Spring lamb is synonymous with the season. This one has a rosemary,garlic coating to keep it moist and flavorful. The meat is sitting on a bed of baby fingerling potatoes, which should get crisp and tender as the lamb cooks.

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Did we get you hungry yet? If you’re in the neighborhood, dinner is at 7!

photos by indigo-jones.

(Easter) Basket Case

March 29, 2013

CHOCOLATS DE PAQUES

It’s Easter, and inevitably, there will be candy. Here are a few “fun” facts to help you decide if it’s really worth it to indulge:

The Chocolate Bunny:

Your average run of the mill drug store bunny is considered 3 servings. Eat the whole thing for a calorie total of almost 700. Add in 66 grams of fat, and almost 70 grams of sugar. It’s filled with high fructose corn syrup, and other additives. If you are going to go the chocolate route, go for rich dark chocolate. It’s heart healthy and so much more satisfying than a waxy tasting chocolate rabbit.

Jelly Beans:

These little nibbles are fat free, but contain 34 grams of sugar. Don’t even think about what created all those attractive colors. ( if you really want to know, click HERE) That lustrous sheen comes from the secretions of female lac bugs, and is very much the same product used to shellac wood. Yum!

Peeps:
Five of these little chicks will cost you about 140 calories. They are fat free, but contain 34 grams of sugar per serving. They have absolutely no nutritional value, and contain sugar, corn syrup, preservatives, yellow dye and carnauba wax, which is commonly used on cars.  The gelatin that gives them their spongy texture, is made of animal skin, bones, hoofs, cartilage and intestines. Many people prefer them when they are stale. Sorry, but that just doesn’t seem appealing to me.

Dove White Chocolate Mini Eggs:

Um, chocolate isn’t white. This confection is made from cocoa butter, powdered milk and sugar, if you’re lucky. The less expensive versions trade the cocoa butter for vegetable oil. There is absolutely no chocolate in white chocolate. These faux -chocolate tidbits pack about 24 grams of sugar and 24 grams of fat. If you love it, go ahead and enjoy it. Just don’t pretend it’s really chocolate.

Cadbury Cream Eggs:

Each one packs 150 calories, 10 grams of fat, 20 grams of sugar, and Castoreum, which is excreted by beaver’s anal glands. And admit it, you aren’t only going to eat one, are you?

Indulgence is fine, as long as it is worth the splurge. In my opinion, these Easter treats are not it for me. I’d rather have something else.

For children, consider making a basket containing real eggs, dyed with natural food colorings, and baby carrots to share with a cute little stuffed bunny.

Happy Easter!

photo: Glasshouse Images

Natural Easter Egg Dyes

March 28, 2013

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This Sunday is Easter, a sacred Christian holiday that has somehow become synonymous with bunnies, chocolate, and colored eggs. Like Christmas, the commercialized aspects of the day have turned it into Everyman’s celebration of spring.  The drugstores, grocery stores and toy stores are filled with bunnies; some stuffed, some chocolate, and some made out of a nasty colored, chemical laden marshmallow mixture. The colored eggs, when not formed from plastic and designed to hold some of the above, are made at home.

There are many ways to dye Easter eggs. Some hard-boil them; some poke a hole and blow the contents out, leaving a hollow egg to embellish. They can be painted, drawn on, covered in fabric, yarn or colorful tapes. There are decals and decorating kits, produced just for this purpose.

I prefer to create eggs that can be eaten. And I sure don’t want to eat something that has been dipped in possibly toxic dyes and vinegar.

Why not consider making naturals dyes, derived from real foods?
Here are a few ideas for creating edible dyes in beautiful hues to enhance your Easter basket:

Chick standing by broken egg, studio shot

Blue:

Boil 2 cups of chopped red cabbage in a quart of water. Add ¼ cup white vinegar. Strain before using.

Alternatively, cook blueberries in water and vinegar for a purple-blue cast.

Lavender:

Mix 1 cup of Concord grape juice with 1 tablespoon of white vinegar.

Pinks and reds:
Simmer 2 chopped beets with ¼ cup vinegar and 3 cups water. Strain before using.

Cranberries can also be used instead, to create another red hue.

Yellow:

Mix 3 cups of water and 3 tablespoons of white vinegar. Bring to a boil and add 2 teaspoons of turmeric. Allow it to steep for at least 10 minutes before using.

Green:

Mix the yellow dye and the blue dye together to create a new color.

Orange:

Mix 2 tablespoons of paprika with 3 cups of water and 3 tablespoons of vinegar and allowing it to steep before using.

Alternatively, mix the red and yellow dyes together to obtain the perfect color.

Allow the dyes to cool before using. The longer the dyes are allowed to steep, the deeper the hue will be. The dye should look darker than the desired shade before using. The longer the eggs are soaked, the deeper the color. Experiment with other colorful foods to create beautiful, edible eggs.

Happy Spring!

photos: Glasshouse Images

New Traditions

April 9, 2012

This year, we celebrated a holiday I coined “Easter-over”. It was intended to be a non-denominational hybrid of Easter, and Passover.

Of the 9 guests, there were 3 non-practicing Jews, a couple of lapsed Catholics, and a few others that didn’t have much of an affiliation to any formalized religion at all.

It was the ideal celebration for me. It paid respect to multiple cultures and holidays, and incorporated lots of different foods.

Wasn’t it ironic, that by the end of the evening, all the “non-Jews” were asking where their favorite part of the Seder went?  Someone hid a matzo, someone else set out a glass of wine for Elijah the Prophet.  Others asked where the haroset, (an apple, nut and wine concoction reminiscent of mortar) was.

I was initially surprised but ultimately realized that the religious implications of the day did not play a significant role. Being with “family”, in this case a multi-cultural group that shared no blood but lots of love and history, was the most important aspect. Those familiar foods and rituals had become an important part of our “family’s” heritage.
Perhaps Easter-over will become a new tradition. If you don’t celebrate Passover or Easter, celebrate spring. Next year go ahead and serve ham and matzo balls if you want to, just do something meaningful with people who love you.

The Easter bunny came and went, and Elijah drank his sweet kosher wine. The matzo was found, and the leftovers packed away. Hopefully the memories will live on.

Happy Easter-over everyone!

photo: Glasshouse Images

Unrecipe of the Week: Easter-over

April 8, 2012

Today we are celebrating “Easter-over”, a non-denominational hybrid of Passover and Easter. The beginning of the meal features classic matzoh ball soup, leading up to a salad of mache and figs, herb roasted leg of lamb, roasted new potatoes and vegetables, and ending with an array of Passover desserts.

This year, in addition to the sponge cake, made from my grandmother’s recipe and cooled upside down on a glass bottle, there are homemade coconut macaroons with a tiny chocolate center, and chocolate matzo brittle.

Matzo brittle is a fairly recent concoction, and not the type of thing I would normally make. I balk at things that start with processed ingredients, and with no disrespect to our state’s acting first lady, the idea of “Semi-Homemade” is unappealing. Yet, something made me want to try this one, and I am glad I did!
It is easy, yet a little messy, and absolutely addictive, regardless of what your heritage might be!

Matzo Brittle

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees.

Cover 2 baking sheets with aluminum foil, including the edges.( you will thank me for this later) and then lay a piece of parchment paper on each pan.

Lay out sheets of plain matzo, using broken pieces to fill any gaps.

In a heavy sauce pan, melt 2 sticks of butter, and 1 cup of brown sugar, stirring until melted together. Allow the mixture to bubble up for about 3 minutes, stirring constantly.

Remove it from the pan and pour it over the matzo, covering each piece evenly.

Put the pans in the oven, and bake for about 15 minutes. The mixture will bubble up.

Remove the pans from the oven, and sprinkle each one with a bag of chocolate chips. Pop back in the oven for about 5 minutes, and then use a spatula to spread the chocolate evenly over the matzo.

Allow to cool, and then break into pieces.

Try not to taste it, or there won’t be any left for the guests.

To all of our readers around the world,Happy Easter-over! May you enjoy a wonderful celebration of the Spring season surrounded by friends and loved ones.

Enjoy!

Unrecipe of the Week

April 3, 2010

One of my favorite desserts is from The Silver Palate Good Times Cookbook by Julee Rosso and Sheila Lukins.  Although it is called Easter Cheesecake, I make it so often that the book automatically flops open to it’s page. It is not really an “unrecipe” but it is easy and always gets rave reviews.  Happy Easter!!

Easter Cheesecake

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees

Crust:

1 cup graham cracker crumbs

¼ chopped walnuts (* I usually substitute pecans)

2 tablespoons brown sugar

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

½ cup (1 stick) melted butter

Combine dry ingredients in a bowl. Add melted butter and toss. Reserve 3 tablespoons of the mixture to top the cake later, and press the remaining evenly into the bottom and about 1 ½ “ up the sides of a 9” round spring form pan.

Conversely, I break a few graham crackers into the bowl of the food processor, toss in the whole nuts and brown sugar, and  coarsely chop it all up. I add the cinnamon and the melted butter and mix it again to blend. This isn’t necessarily easier, but it does take away the need to buy the graham crackers and the nuts pre -chopped. Confession: I don’t actually measure this part either!

Filling:

2 cups sour cream

3 – 8oz. packages of cream cheese

3 eggs

1 cup sugar

½ teaspoon salt

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Finely grated zest of one orange

Process the sour cream, cream cheese, eggs, salt and sugar in the food processor until smooth. Add the vanilla and the orange zest and mix to blend.

Pour the mixture into the crust filled pan and bake 50 minutes.
Sprinkle the reserved topping on the cake and bake another 10-15 minutes more. The top may crack, but should not become overly brown.

Cool the cake completely and then remove the sides and refrigerate until ready to serve.

Enjoy!

photo: Glasshouse Images


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