Posts Tagged ‘canola oil’

Smoking Hot

August 9, 2013

2117900092

We love olive oil. It is heart healthy, tastes great and enhances our salad dressings and pastas, pesto and hummus, among other things. We use it for most of our cooking needs.
However, there are lots of kitchen chores where less popular oils are better suited to the task at hand.

All fats have a smoke point: the point in which the oil begins to smoke and burn when heated. Once oil reaches that point, it, and the food cooked in it not only tastes bad, but can also be bad for you. It starts to break down chemically and releases toxins and carcinogenic free radicals through the smoke.

Olive oil, in comparison to other oils, has a relatively low smoke point. It is not recommended for frying, searing, stir frying or roasting at high temperatures.

Canola oil has a much higher smoke point and has a neutral flavor that does not over power foods. Like olive oil, it also is low in saturated fats, and may help reduce the risk of cardio vascular disease.

Below is a guide to several different oils and their smoke points:
Butter          325 degrees

Olive oil      325-400 degrees, depending on quality

Coconut oil 350-450 degrees, depending on refinement

Corn oil       425-450 degrees

Canola oil   450-475 degrees

Peanut oil    450-475 degrees

Safflower oil 475-500 degrees (if refined)

photo: glasshouse images

Like us on Facebook, follow us on TwitterTumblr and Pinterest too!

Unrecipe of the Week: Homemade Tortillas

August 20, 2012

My family loves Tex-Mex inspired dishes and anything in a tortilla seems to get eaten. Tonight, I served homemade tortillas and they were a big hit!

Surprisingly easy to make, these flour tortillas are a bit smaller and more rustic than the machine formed ones, and taste much better. You can always size them up and make a few less, if you prefer larger ones.

Homemade Tortillas

Mix together 3 cups flour, ½ teaspoon baking power and 1 teaspoon salt. Add 1/3-cup canola oil and mix it with your hands until it resembles fine crumbs. Add 1 cup hot water and knead the dough into a ball. Cover with plastic wrap for at least 30 minutes before using. You can leave the dough out for several hours, or refrigerate it overnight, if you like to plan ahead.

When you are ready to make the tortillas, divide the dough into 12 equal pieces.

Roll them into balls and flatten them on a lightly floured surface. Gently roll them into circles.

Cook them  in a hot, ungreased frying pan over medium high heat until one side is blistered. Stack them up and keep warm until ready to serve.

I filled them with lime-marinated chicken breasts, diced fresh tomatoes and homemade guacamole. Even B loved them!


%d bloggers like this: