Posts Tagged ‘balsamic vinegar’

Unrecipe of the Week: Slow Cooker Pulled Pork

January 25, 2016

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New York is experiencing a blizzard today, and everyone is longing for something warm, and hearty. Slow days like this call for slow cooking. This dish has all the right elements for a snow day. It comes together in no time, and fills the house with a delicious aroma of things to come. It is also made from things I have on hand since venturing out to the grocery store is not really an option.

This is one of the easiest ways to use the slow cooker, as this pulled pork requires no marinating, no pre-searing of the meat and almost no mess. Simply place the pork tenderloin in  the slow cooker, add the one bowl sauce, and let it cook. Later, the tender, juicy meat can be shredded and served on fluffy brioche buns for a comfort food sandwich that everyone will enjoy.

Slow Cooker Pulled Pork: ( adapted from Le Creme de la Crumb)

Place a pork tenderloin into the slow cooker bowl.

In a separate bowl mix together 1/2 cup of balsamic vinegar, 1 cup of water, 1/4 cup of honey, 3 tablespoons of brown sugar and 2 tablespoons of soy sauce. Add a couple of diced garlic cloves and about 1/2 of a small onion finely diced. Sprinkle the pork with a black pepper and pour the sauce over it.
Cover, and cook at high for about 4 1/2 -5 hours.

Drain the sauce into a sauce pan and bring to a slow boil. Mix together a tablespoon of cornstarch and a some water until it forms a smooth paste. Whisk a little at a time into the sauce, and let it simmer for a few minutes until thickened.

In the meantime, use forks to shred the pork. Alternatively, you can toss it into the electric mixer with the paddle attachment, and mix on a low speed until it shreds. (It is easier, but you have to wash another bowl, and frankly, who wants to do that? But to each his own!)

Serve on toasted brioche buns and enjoy!

Photo: Spencer Jones Glasshouse Assignment

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Unrecipe of the Week: Arugula and Stone Fruit Salad

September 15, 2014

Battling lunchtime boredom is a real issue with me. I want to eat something that is fresh, healthy, low in calories and low in refined carbs. It needs to be easily transportable, and cant’t take too much prep time in the morning. That often leaves me tied to my desk with a lackluster salad, or a bowl of Greek yogurt. Until now.

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See how it went so beautifully with the pile of books on my desk?

This salad combination awakened all of my senses: It’s rich autumnal colors made it beautiful to behold. The flavors are a unique combination of sweet, salty, and slightly bitter. The textures range from crisp to soft and succulently juicy. It was ready in minutes and fit perfectly into a compact mason jar, dressing and all! In a word, perfection.

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Arugula and Stone Fruit Salad:

In the bottom of a mason jar, drizzle a little bit of olive oil and aged balsamic vinegar. The balsamic vinegar that has been aged 10 years or more has an almost syrup-like consistency, and tends to be much sweeter than regular balsamic. If you don’t have it, no worries, just use the regular kind, and adjust the quantity accordingly. ( You will want a bit more.) Next add a few big handfuls of baby arugula, and pack it in tightly. Core and chop the stone fruit of your choice ( I have been using nectarines and plums) and put it on top of the arugula. Lastly, add some diced ricotta salata cheese and seal the jar. You can substitute feta, goat or even mozzarella cheese if you prefer. For a little more crunch, add a sprinkling of chopped nuts.

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When you are ready to eat the salad, shake the jar to mix the dressing in, pour it into a bowl and enjoy!

photos: indigojonesnyc instagram

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Unrecipe of the Week: Balsamic Marinade

July 22, 2013

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It’s grilling season, and marinades help lock in moisture and add flavor to foods.

Whether you are tossing meat, chicken or vegetables on the barbeque, or cooking in the oven, this unrecipe will become a staple in your repertoire.

Balsamic Marinade:

Combine ½ cup balsamic vinegar, juice of 2 lemons, ½ cup olive oil, a big dollop or two of Dijon mustard, a couple of minced garlic cloves, and salt and pepper. Whisk to blend. Pour over meat or chicken and allow it to marinate for several hours or overnight. Vegetables should be marinated for a very short time, to avoid getting soggy.

Kitchen tip:

Never pour leftover marinade that the raw meat has been soaking in over cooked food. Once the food has been put on the grill, use a clean plate to remove it to avoid contamination.

Bringing the leftover marinade to a full boil for a couple of minutes will kill any bacteria and allow the sauce to be safely used. Cooking it for 5 or 10 minutes will allow the liquid to reduce, and give you a slightly thicker consistency for a finishing sauce.

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photo: Glasshouse Images

 

Unrecipe of the Week

September 16, 2009

1279800115.JPGChicken with Dried Apricots and Thyme

As autumn approaches, it’s nice to change up the ingredients and create dishes that feel more in keeping with the season. The dried apricots, balsamic vinegar and woodsy thyme make this chicken dish a perfect entrée for fall.

Sprinkle skinless, boneless chicken breasts with salt and pepper and sauté in olive oil until browned on both sides.

Add balsamic vinegar (a few tablespoons) and chicken broth (about a cup or so) to the pan. The breasts should be almost covered with liquid.

Add dried apricots and several thyme sprigs (stems removed) to the pan.

Cook on medium heat until the chicken is cooked through and tender, and most of the liquid is evaporated, about 20 minutes. The sauce should start to caramelize slightly.

This is great when served with cous cous or brown rice.

Enjoy!

Helpful hint: To easily remove the leaves from fresh herbs, such as rosemary and thyme, simply run your thumb and forefinger down the stem, grabbing the leaves as you go. They should fall off easily!

photo: Glasshouse Images


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