Posts Tagged ‘Disney’

indigo jones on huffpost live

October 20, 2012

Yesterday, I had the opportunity to appear on Huffpost Live.  A panel of people debated the impact that Barney’s and Disney’s re-proportioning of their beloved characters has on the body image of young girls. This subject was also the featured in yesterday’s post on indigo jones.

The conversation was lively, with everyone on the panel other than myself taking the stance that anything we do that sends the message that you are not perfect just the way you are, is wrong. When I came home last night and read the 285 comments on the piece, I was surprised to see that many viewers agreed with me; it’s all in good fun. My own readers also thought that we were losing our sense of humor over this.

Check out the segment on Huffpost Live and tell me what you think: Do these overly exaggerated fashion figures send a negative body image message?

Leave a comment, and join the conversation!

Skinny Minnie Mouse?

October 19, 2012

New York fashion emporium Barney’s is teaming up with Disney for this year’s holiday promotion, entitled “Electric Holiday.”

The campaign features a 3-D film in which Disney’s most iconic and beloved character’s appear as supermodels in Paris, strutting the catwalks in designer fashions.

Early images have leaked, and fury over the reed thin physiques given to Minnie Mouse, Daisy Duck and Goofy has caused quite a stir.

Enraged activists and parents alike, have banded together against the re-proportioning of the characters, saying that they send a negative body image message to children.

Granted, the bodies are exaggerated to an extreme. But is it all in good fun, or truly problematic?

Barney’s is one of the most high-end retailers in the country. It has only 11 outposts in the United States, all of which are in status locations.

The company is also known for it’s irreverent and humorous approach to marketing, especially in its holiday windows. Even the Queen of England was not immune to their witty treatment.

Barney’s does not market to children. It is not a national chain. It certainly does not cater to the masses. Those who are the target clientele will most likely respond favorably to this film. So where is the harm? Without all of this press, how many children would actually be affected by it?

Join me on Huff Post Live this Friday, October 19, at 1:00 Eastern Standard Time, as we debate whether or not Barney’s and Disney is sending a negative message to young girls about body image.

 http://live.huffingtonpost.com/

House of Mouse Launches a Healthy Marketing Initiative

June 7, 2012

Today, Disney announced a new initiative that would impose strict guidelines on the foods that are advertised on their TV shows, radio stations and sold in their amusement parks.

With First Lady Michelle Obama by his side, Robert Iger, Chairman of the Walt Disney Company unveiled plans to ensure that all food advertised, sponsored or promoted through its media outlets meet federal dietary guidelines and encourage the consumption of fruits and vegetables, limit portion sizes and calories, and have a reduced sugar, saturated fat and sodium content. The plan will be fully implemented by 2015.

Iger also announced the new graphic symbol called a “Mickey Check”, which will appear on all branded food items sold at parks, resorts and grocery stores which feature Disney characters on the package. These foods currently include fresh fruit, dairy items and drinks. The “Mickey Check” features the tag line. “ Good for you – fun too!” and will serve to assure parents that the food they are purchasing is healthy.

The Disney announcement fully supports Mrs. Obama’s “Let’s Move” campaign, which promotes a healthy and active lifestyle for children. Having Disney’s iconic characters helping fight the battle of childhood obesity is a pivotal change in how we market to children.

Fashion Faux Pas at Forty

May 13, 2011

When it comes to fashion, how old is too old to carry off the look?

A recent article in London’s Daily Mail posed the question to 2000 women, aged 18-65, and the answers were surprising.

A whopping 44% of the women polled regularly worry that they are too old to wear certain items of clothing.

The group believes that miniskirts should be taboo after age 35, and stilettos should be banned by age 51. Knee-high boots were deemed inappropriate after the age of 47, leather pants at age 34 and tight tops at age 44. The most shocking revelation was perhaps their contention that women should not wear bikinis over the age of 47, and by age 61, swimsuits in general should be avoided completely.  Hello, have you ladies not seen Helen Mirren in a bathing suit?

Startlingly, body shape was not a factor in their decisions.  As a woman of “a certain age” who spends quality time in the gym, working out and eating healthfully, I am offended by the assertion that I may be too old to wear certain of these items.  I am equally appalled by the young women who are seriously over weight walking around with rolls of exposed fat oozing over the tops of their jeans, bellies exposed.  Is it their right to dress tastelessly because they are young?

Only minutes after reading this article, I saw a post on the gossip site Perez Hilton; regarding the inappropriate display of flesh when 13-year-old Disney starlet Bella Thorne was photographed wearing a skimpy bikini on the beach.  The 85 comments that followed seemed to agree that she was too young to be flaunting her body, albeit a childlike one, in public.

So, if 13 is too young, and 47 is too old, what is the fashion sweet spot?  Are we to be relegated to frumpiness just because we are over 40?  From the overwhelming response to the article, the answer is clearly and resoundingly, NO!

Let your mirror be your guide, and good taste be your barometer for style regardless of your age.

Otherwise, when I hit 53, and have to cut off my hair, wear sensible shoes and elastic waist pants, please just shoot me!


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