Posts Tagged ‘celery’

Easter-over

March 30, 2013

Tonight we are celebrating “Easter-over” a hybrid of Easter, Passover and a celebration of spring. It’s an opportunity to indulge in the flavors and traditions of the holidays, and the diversity of the guests. The rules are simple: it’s my made up holiday,and  it’s appropriate to serve anything I feel like making, within the confines of the season and the holidays. That could mean matzoh balls and pork chops, or gefilte fish and fried chicken, but it’s not either one of those.
This year, I have mixed it up, and for those of you who follow us on Facebook, or Instagram, you have been getting hints of things to come.

Here are a few “works in progress”, as our Easter-over feast comes together:

A beautiful mess of food scraps. What were they from?

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Personally, I loathe raw, red onions, and will surgically remove them from my food if they are there. Sometimes, a recipe really needs a little jolt, and these do the job well. They look pretty, don’t they?

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Nothing says spring like daffodils and asparagus!

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Apples, walnuts, honey, cinnamon….what could this be?

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Yum,chocolate! That’s a little almond flour you see. This one just happens to be gluten free and passover approved!

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Maybe a little white chocolate bourbon cream to put on top would be nice…

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Spring lamb is synonymous with the season. This one has a rosemary,garlic coating to keep it moist and flavorful. The meat is sitting on a bed of baby fingerling potatoes, which should get crisp and tender as the lamb cooks.

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Did we get you hungry yet? If you’re in the neighborhood, dinner is at 7!

photos by indigo-jones.

CSA Tuesday

December 5, 2012

It’s that time of the week again; CSA Tuesday!
Today we got golden beets, potatoes, cauliflower, brussels sprouts, cilantro and celery.

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Brussels sprouts, still on the stalk!

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Fresh cauliflower.

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Golden beets.

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Cilantro.

It’s been so busy, that it may have to wait until Sunday to get cooked and eaten. We still have leftovers from last week’s haul!

photos: Spencer Jones

Feeding Hurricane Sandy

October 29, 2012

All of us in New York are hunkering down and waiting for Hurricane Sandy to have her way with us. Sunday was spent preparing lots of leftover ingredients into edible dishes.
The leeks, celery and potatoes became a delicious potato leek soup; rich and creamy, without the added calories of cream.

The pumpkins were roasted and pureed. A pumpkin tart was quickly assembled, using what I had in the house. The traditional evaporated milk was hastily replaced by coconut milk, with no adverse reactions to the texture or flavor.

The leftover roasted pumpkin puree will become pumpkin gnocchi tomorrow night, assuming I can see to cook it!

There is still a giant cabbage awaiting it’s fate. I think the carrots and celery can get slivered in with the cabbage and tossed with an avocado dressing,assuming we have electricity for the blender. I guess sooner or later, they will be soft enough to blend by hand!

The flashlights have batteries, the bathtubs are filled with emergency water, and the candles and matches are laid out on the dining table.
We are as ready as we can be for Sandy’s wrath.

We hope all of our east coast readers weather the storm safely.
We will continue to post as long as we have the internet connection to do so.

Leave a comment to share your hurricane stories here…

CSA Tuesday

October 17, 2012

After last week’s bitter greens extravaganza, it was nice to see a more balanced assortment of produce from my CSA.

We got 2 butternut squash, an eggplant, a carnival squash, arugula, celery, radishes and collard greens.

There is easily the makings of a salad for the uncreative nights, and perhaps some butternut squash ravioli if the weekend is not too crazy.

I have been taking whatever is leftover at the end of the week and making “CSA Soup.” So far, they have been interesting, filling and very low calorie.

CSA Soup:

Dice a small onion and saute it in a little olive oil. Add chopped up “whatever is left” and add it to the pot. Add enough broth ( chicken or vegetable) to the pot to fully cover the vegetables.  Cover the pot and allow it to simmer until the vegetables soften. Puree the soup until it is smooth. Season according to taste.

I have used roasted butternut squash and kale, and spinach and  tat soi so far. You really can’t go wrong.

I have frozen the soup in individual containers, and taken them out for an easy, nourishing lunch.

Enjoy!

CSA Tuesday

October 3, 2012

It’s Tuesday and that means it’s time to pick up our farm selection from the CSA. Today’s assortment is more balanced than it has been:

There is a huge butternut squash, a head of lettuce, some young broccoli rabe without any florets ( the jury is out on that one until it’s cooked),red potatoes, a beautiful bouquet of kale, some rosemary and a bunch of celery.

I am thinking about a simple vegetarian dinner tonight, especially if it prevents me from having to go back out in the rain again!

Any great ideas out there?

The Clean 15

June 5, 2012

We have written here about the “Dirty Dozen,” a list of produce that has the highest levels of pesticides and contamination. It is recommended that these foods be organic wherever possible.

There is another list called the “Clean 15”, which have the lowest pesticide load, and can be enjoyed in the conventional varieties.

These are:

Onions

Sweet corn

Pineapples

Avocado

Sweet peas

Mangoes

Eggplant

Cantaloupe

Kiwi

Watermelon

Sweet potatoes

Grapefruit

Mushrooms

Asparagus

Other foods, such as broccoli, cabbage and tomatoes have more recently tested cleaner as well, due to less pest threats, and therefore less spraying.

Many of these fruits and vegetables have a protective outer layer that gets peeled or removed before eating. This helps eliminate the toxins, which are largely on the outside of the food.

The current list of the most harmful foods tested positive for at least 47 different chemicals, and as many as 67. Buying organic insures that the fruit and vegetables are not treated with harmful pesticides.

Foods that should be organic:

Celery

Strawberries

Peaches

Apples

Blueberries

Nectarines

Sweet bell peppers

Spinach, kale and collard greens

Cherries

Potatoes

Grapes

Lettuce

This lists were compiled by the Environmental Working Group, which is an organization made up of scientists, researchers and policymakers. The data used was supplied by the United States Department of Agriculture’s tests for pesticide residue on fresh produce.

photos: Glasshouse Images

 

Unrecipe of the Week

July 13, 2011

This week, I have been making lettuce-less salads for lunch. So far, this is my favorite:

 Cucumber Salad with Mint and Tomatoes

Chop ½ a cucumber, 2 small stalks of celery and a small tomato.

Add a handful of chopped parsely and fresh mint leaves.

Mix in ½ cup beans and 1/8 cup feta cheese crumbles.

Drizzle with olive oil and the juice of one lime.

Season with  sea salt and pepper.

Toss and enjoy!

photo: Glasshouse Images

In partnership with Glasshouse Images

Unrecipe of the Week

June 6, 2011

As the weather gets warmer, I am always looking for cold, vegetable dishes.  This one, adapted from Ina Garten, drew rave reviews from vegetarians and carnivores alike.

Celery Salad with Parmesan and Walnuts

Whisk together 1 minced shallot, the zest and juice from 3 lemons, ½ cup of olive oil, and a good squeeze of anchovy paste.  Add 1/2 teaspoon of celery seed, 1 teaspoon of celery salt and 1 teaspoon of pepper.

Pour over 2 bunches of celery, scraped and cut on the diagonal into thin slices.  Refrigerate 1 hour or more to allow flavors to develop.

When ready to serve, spread the celery mixture on a platter and sprinkle with toasted chopped walnuts, coarsely chopped parsley, and shaved Parmesan cheese.

Enjoy!

photo: Glasshouse Images

Color Me Red

October 17, 2010

A Florida producer is unveiling it’s latest product this week; RED CELERY!

The celery is the brainchild of grower Larry Pierce, who has been trying to develop the vegetable since 1991.  Using European Heritage seeds and natural breeding techniques, the celery is said to taste just like it’s green forbearer.

The celery was created to add a sense of uniqueness to one of the less popular vegetables in our diets. The distributor, Duda Farm Fresh Foods, is hoping that the color makes it more interesting to children, and spices up the look of traditional crudités.

The celery will be introduced first on the West Coast, December 1.

Will you be eating red celery?

Unrecipe of the Week

February 28, 2010

What better thing to do on a cold, winter day, than make homemade soup?
This vegetable soup is so easy to make, that it just isn’t worth buying the preservative and sodium-laden versions at the grocery store.

I cheated, and used some frozen vegetables. At this time of the year, certain things are not readily available, and the frozen varieties still contain the nutrients found in the fresh versions. Experiment with different combinations of vegetables. You really can’t go wrong here!

Homemade Vegetable Soup

Saute  a large, diced onion in a little olive oil, until soft.

Add diced carrots, celery, peas, spinach, corn and tomatoes. (I used canned San Marzano diced tomatoes and added the whole thing, including the juices).

Add 1 or 2 cans of red kidney beans, and / or cannellini beans, rinsed.

Fill the pot with chicken or vegetable broth and bring to a boil.

Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Simmer the soup for an hour or two, until the flavors begin to meld.

Serve with a dollop of pesto for extra flavor.

Enjoy!

photo: Glasshouse Images


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